Venice Restored 1815

WeisSaul

Ad Honorem
Mar 2012
2,836
New Amsterdam
#1
So let's suppose that in 1815 Venice is restored with all its pre 1797 territories: Venice, Dalmatia, Istria, and the Ionian Islands.

Could Venice united Italy along with/in spite of Piedmont-Sardinia? With Venice reestablished, could Italy unite earlier?

Could Italy's colonial holdings be larger and/or more numerous?
 
May 2012
214
in the sky with diamonds
#2
I am not sure that the Venetians, with all their former power restored, would have intentions for unification.

I suspect that the Italian identity would not have prevailed and they would still consider themselves firstly Venetians and secondly Italians in the boarder sense.
That because Venice was throughout it's history a republic, thus creating a strong local Venetian identity for it's citizens. Unlike of course the citizens of other states with medieval/feudal tradition who were closer connected to their individual lords (kings,dukes etc)

On the other hand, the constant threat of the Austrian empire would have driven them to make close alliances with other Italian states and maybe France.

But I'm not sure that they would have been willing to be the driving force behind a complete Italian unification, thus partly sacrificing their local identity, for which they were throughout centuries very proud of.
 
Aug 2011
4,213
Gaillimh (Ireland)
#3
So let's suppose that in 1815 Venice is restored with all its pre 1797 territories: Venice, Dalmatia, Istria, and the Ionian Islands.

Could Venice united Italy along with/in spite of Piedmont-Sardinia? With Venice reestablished, could Italy unite earlier?

Could Italy's colonial holdings be larger and/or more numerous?
1) No

18th century Venice was a mere shell of the maritime empire that dominated the Mediterranean seas for centuries: its military fleet was pityful just like the army...but the worst thing was the attitude of the Venetian ruling class,they lived only to maintain a sort of "status quo",voluntarily cut off from the rest of Europe(living in the so called "soap bubble").
The fact that the Doge of Venice decided to surrender the Republic to Napoleon without even fighting(despite the fact that a wise defensive strategy could have easily halted the French armies) explains a lot about the extreme weakness of Venice.

Venice was on the verge of dominating the peninsula during the early 16th century,but soon half Europe declared war on the Serenissima...The stubborn defence during the War of the League of Cambrai, now that's what Venice was all about:cool::cool:

2)Probably(present day Croatia,Albania,Greece...) but that's not so important,since the Italian Empire was completely destroyed during WWII.