Video about the continous Decline of the British Industry Economy Technology 1895-1914 period.

Mar 2019
6
cucumber
#1
Britain in the 20th Century: Responses to Decline, 1895-1914 - Professor Vernon Bogdanor



It was during these years that British statesmen first came to appreciate that her international and economic position was under threat. The growth of German and American economic power exposed the fragility of Britain's hitherto unquestioned pre-eminence. Imperialism was the first response to decline, social reform the second. It was these years that saw the first stirrings of a new collectivism in the 'New Liberalism'. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and... Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. http://www.gresham.ac.uk
 
Mar 2019
6
cucumber
#2
As the British industrial exports started to shrink on European and American markets, the British response was the escape to her colonies, where the technological competition was not so hard.
 
Sep 2015
1,602
England
#3
Typical. Literally, why am i not surprised? From "pre-eminence" to "fragility"... withering no?... literally, what on earth are the chances... and thus the use of language, gosh & golly, how could things be otherwise from such a venerable, illustrious institution...

no, i don't know either.

And then, 'Imperialism was the first response to decline, social reform the second.' really, mm? How likely does that actually sound ?
If you listen very carefully
 
Last edited:
Sep 2015
1,602
England
#4
And the beginnings of social investigation began after 1899... apparently! who knew?

And i quote, 'From the 1770s onwards doctors began to notice the impact of environment, and studies in London (1774) and Manchester (1795) identified medical problems in their social context... etc etc...[4eg] James Kay's survey of Manchester (1832)... It was fortunate that just when in the 1830s the volume of literature was sufficient to make out a public health case, the administrator Edwin Chadwick was exposed to the evidence...The creation of the Poor Law Commission in 1834 together with the ancillary office of Registrar-General in 1837-8, combined to create an administrative momentum whose "spin-off" effects vitally affected the public health question...[and which] eventually produced some legislative progress... Public complacency was certainly shattered and the early Victorian conscience aroused.'

As the structure and form of the political constitution was fought for and argued over, and the movement towards centralisation begun, more effective social reform was advanced across the second half of the c.19th.

Prof Geoffrey Best also has some stuff to say on this broad question up to 1875.

But we are inspired to find out more, we are inclined to acquire a thorough understanding of the subject area. So - so what!