Vietnamese people commented on the event "Japanese fascists surrendered unconditionally"

At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,930
Bulgaria
In 1938 the Japanese were certainly of great concern. What frustrated Stalin more is that the British and French were not negotiating in good faith, and were obviously refusing to unite vs Hitler.
The Japanese were still a concern to Stalin until the attack on Pearl Harbor. The Soviets still had to keep a lot of troops in the Far East even during Barbarossa.
Western historiography severely underestimates how much the situation in the Far East effected the decisions in their European theater, esp. in 1938-41 period. They treat it as two separate conflicts, when it wasn't so for the Soviets at all. Even the Soviet invasion of Poland in 1939 hinged on the events in the Far East. In that early Sept. of 1939, the majority of Stalin's focus is on Japan and not even Poland at all.
The whole period of 39-41 was a very closely run thing for the Soviets, and Stalin knew it as it was happening. They didn't have the luxury to create more enemies than they needed. They understood perfectly well that at the very least the survival of the regime was at stake.
Yes, the famous veteran Siberian divisions deployed in the Far East to protect USSR eastern borders against a possible attack by Japan before Barbarossa. Due to one man, Richard Sorge and the trust of Stalin in his spy network in Japan, these were transferred west from October to November 1941 in time for the battle for Moscow.
 
Aug 2014
296
New York, USA
Yes, the famous veteran Siberian divisions deployed in the Far East to protect USSR eastern borders against a possible attack by Japan before Barbarossa. Due to one man, Richard Sorge and the trust of Stalin in his spy network in Japan, these were transferred west from October to November 1941 in time for the battle for Moscow.
The bulk of the Soviet Far East forces bordering Manchuria only started the transfer in the beginning of 1942. Siberian/Central Asian divisions that were transferred in 1941 for the battle of Moscow were not technically from the Far East, just east of the Urals. Soviets maintained a whole Front (army group) throughout the whole 1941 facing Japan. These fresh far eastern formations would surprise Germans in 1942, just like the fresh Siberian troops surprised them in the winter of 1941, when the Germans assumed the Soviets were on their last legs.
By 1944, most of the front was stripped and shipped to fight in Europe with only some nominal defense remaining (40% of strength at best). In 1945, divisions had to be shipped back to Manchuria for the invasion.
 
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At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
3,930
Bulgaria
The bulk of the Soviet Far East forces bordering Manchuria only started the transfer in the beginning of 1942. Siberian/Central Asian divisions that were transferred in 1941 for the battle of Moscow were not technically from the Far East, just east of the Urals. Soviets maintained a whole Front (army group) throughout the whole 1941 facing Japan. These fresh far eastern formations would surprise Germans in 1942, just like the fresh Siberian troops surprised them in the winter of 1941, when the Germans assumed the Soviets were on their last legs.
By 1944, most of the front was stripped and shipped to fight in Europe with only some nominal defense remaining (40% of strength at best). In 1945, divisions had to be shipped back to Manchuria for the invasion.
Yes, i do realise my mistake. Siberia is the area between the Ural Mountains and the Far East, so basically the huge region north from Central Asia / Far East itself is not Siberia. So they kept divisions near Manchurian border ready to repel the Kwantung army till 1942 after Pearl Harbor? Could you please recommend me a book about the situation in the Far East, movement of troops you described during WWII.