Viking hoard of 200 objects is found in Lancashire

Nov 2011
1,749
Bolton, UK
A Viking hoard discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in northern England has been hailed as one of the most important Viking finds in recent times.

Darren Webster discovered them lying just 18 inches below the surface of a field in Silverdale in the city of Lancaster, Lancashire. The 201 objects, including coins, could be worth an incredible half-a-million pounds.

Experts believe that one of the 27 coins carries the name of a previously unknown Viking ruler in northern England.

One coin depicts the name Alwaldus, who is thought to have been the nephew of King Alfred the Great, who was king of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex - which occupied what is now south west England - between 871 and 899.

Lancaster City Museum is interested in buying the find for its collection.

The proceeds are expected to be divided between Mr Webster and the owner of the land.

Raed more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2074039/Incredible-Viking-hoard-blanks-murky-period-British-history.html


Artefacts: Darren Webster holds a Viking arm ring which was part of a hoard of the Viking treasure he found in Silverdale


Webster's hoard: A Viking coin depicting the name Alwaldus, which has been attributed to the nephew of King Alfred the Great, the king of Wessex between 871 and 899.

 
May 2016
47
Ragnarok
In Silverdale Lancashire, England and the year 2011 a very special coin type was found - none had seen before. One side of it reads » dns rex « which is the latin abbreviation of the word Dominus and Rex for King.

On the other side, the inscription reads ‘Airdeconut’ which appears to be an attempt to represent the Scandinavian name Hardacnut, a ruler not previously known. The word can be divided into two parts - ‘airde’ and ‘conut’ - where the last part has a striking similarity to canut(e). In the Anglo-Saxon world, the name Cnut is changed to the English Canute due to difficulties with the Nordic sound ‘cn’. In Latin we see the later word Canutus used. The first part ‘airde’ seems to be initially gibberish but inserting a missing H will express the part as Ha(i)rde. The result is that Airdeconut is identical to (H)a(i)rde-c(o)(a)nut - i.e. Hardecanut(e).

The missing H is also seen as Ardecnut, Artdcnut on coins of the later king Hardacnut, son of Cnut the Great (Re: Hauberg, Dansk Mønt). Therefore, the researchers in linguistics assess that Airdeconut must be the mintmasters attempt to reproduce the difficult name Harðacnvt.

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May 2016
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The name Hardacnut is extremely rare and only three or four people of the Danish genus have had this name.

In the mid- or late 11th-century 'Historia de Sancto Cuthberto' - this narrative describes a king of York elected in 883 with the name Guthred filium Hardacnut. A contemporary examples of evidence for this king is a Guthfrith in Æthelweard's Chronicle 895 - and the term 'Airdeconut' mentioned on the coin from the Silverdale hoard, estimated deposition 900-10 AD.

Chronicon Æthelweardi 895 states - ‘when the course of one year was at an end, Guthfrith, king of the Northumbrians, died on the nativity of St Bartholomew the apostle of Christ (August 24) and his body is entombed in the city of York in the principal church’ (basilica summa).
 
May 2016
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Ragnarok
The British Museum writes about Silverdale -

‘The artefacts and coins together bear witness to diverse cultural contacts and a wide Viking mercantile network, extending from Ireland in the West to central or northern Russia and the Islamic world in the East. The hacksilver and weight-adjusted armrings served as a form of currency in a bullion economy. This perspective further reinforces the picture gained most recently by study of the finds from the Vale of York hoard, discovered only in 2007. Probably the most significant connection to emerge from a preliminary examination of the Silverdale finds is the similarity shown by a number of the objects to pieces from the rather larger Vikingage hoard discovered at Cuerdale, near Preston in Lancashire in 1840. The Cuerdale hoard can be dated to c. 905-10 on the basis of the combination of the coins. The Silverdale hoard contains many of the same types, and was apparently buried at much the same time, or possibly slightly earlier. While further work may produce a more secure date, an approximate date of c. 900-910 seems safe at present ’.
 
Sep 2015
392
The Eastern Hinterlands
A Viking hoard discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in northern England has been hailed as one of the most important Viking finds in recent times.

Darren Webster discovered them lying just 18 inches below the surface of a field in Silverdale in the city of Lancaster, Lancashire. The 201 objects, including coins, could be worth an incredible half-a-million pounds.

Experts believe that one of the 27 coins carries the name of a previously unknown Viking ruler in northern England.

One coin depicts the name Alwaldus, who is thought to have been the nephew of King Alfred the Great, who was king of the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex - which occupied what is now south west England - between 871 and 899.

Lancaster City Museum is interested in buying the find for its collection.

The proceeds are expected to be divided between Mr Webster and the owner of the land.

Raed more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2074039/Incredible-Viking-hoard-blanks-murky-period-British-history.html


Artefacts: Darren Webster holds a Viking arm ring which was part of a hoard of the Viking treasure he found in Silverdale


Webster's hoard: A Viking coin depicting the name Alwaldus, which has been attributed to the nephew of King Alfred the Great, the king of Wessex between 871 and 899.

Fascinating. Hopefully more great finds will occur in the near future.
 
May 2016
47
Ragnarok
The Cuerdale Hoard is a hoard of more than 8,600 items, including silver coins, English and Carolingian jewellery, hacksilver and ingots. It was discovered on 15 May 1840 on the southern bank of a bend of the River Ribble, in an area called Cuerdale near Preston, Lancashire, England.

 
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May 2016
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The Vale of York Hoard was found in 2007 – one of the most significant Viking discoveries ever made in Britain. The 617 coins and 68 pieces of jewellery demonstrate a trading network that stretched from the North Atlantic to the Middle East and Central Asia. The Vale of York Hoard (previously known as the Harrogate Hoard) was discovered near Harrogate in January 2007. The hoard dates to c.928 AD and includes coins from Samarkand, Afghanistan and Baghdad, and a fragment of a Russian ring, as well as an Irish arm ring. As such, it demonstrates the wide range of contacts in the Viking world.


 
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May 2016
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Ragnarok
York was the principal and longest-lasting bastion of independent Norse power in England. The takeover of Jórvik created the northern Norse powerbase, an important trading and manufacturing centre on the East-West trading chain between Jórvik, Dublin and Scandinavia, and beyond, to Russia, Constantinople and Baghdad. These were beneficial connections, which fed new contacts into the Anglo-Saxon economy, alongside its own established network of merchants and traders, with their own links to the Baltic, the Low Countries, Germany, France, down to Italy and the Mediterranean.

The approx. 44 kilogram of silver contained in the Cuerdale- and Silverdale hoards deposited around 900, including additional 617 coins from the Vale of York hoard deposited 927, gives a good idea of what size of lucrative import-export business there was manage by the jointly Norse kings from Dublin and York. The sources mention that the Norse king Sigfred of York (between 895-900) maintained a fleet of 40 units.