Vinča script - a myth

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,374
Republika Srpska
#1
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In the image above, in the third column we have the supposed Vinča script, a long standing feature in Serb pseudohistorical circles. The Vinča writing is apparently the oldest writing in history, 373 years older than the oldest Sumerian writing and it is apparently the script from which other script such as Etruscan and Latin are descended. Of course, Serbian Cyrillic is considered the purest form of the ancient Vinča writing. However, is there any truth in the story of Vinča script?

Well, this is what we know about the Vinča culture. It was a Neolithic culture based in the Balkans, mostly in Serbia and existed in the 6th and 5th millenium BC. Miloje Vasić, the man who discovered the Vinča site, did note certain symbols and carvings associated with the culture but, unlike what modern pseudohistorians claim, never claimed those symbols represented a form of writing. No, the story of Vinča script starts with a man, Svetislav Bilbija, a member of the Institute of Etruscan Studies in Chicago. There was only a slight problem with the Institute. No one ever heard of it. But I digress. In 1984 he published a book Staroevropski jezik i poreklo Etruraca (Old European language and the origin of the Etruscans). In it, he interprets Etruscan language by using Serbian Cyrillic. Bilbija also claimed that Etruscans should be called Rascians and that their language was the same language used today by the Serbs. Thing is, it seems that Biblija was not the most unbiased source on the matter. He seems to have suffered from the "Ancient Aliens" syndrome in which you already decide what the result is and then you mold the evidence in order to suit your theory. One example: he translated the word Cerun (meaning Geryon, a figure in the Heraclean tasks) as Perun, an old Slavic god. This is not the only example. Throughout the book Bilbija translates old Etruscan words in order to make them fit the Serbian language.

Yet the true start of Vinča script came with a man named Radivoje Pešić. Who is Radivoje Pešić? We simply have no idea. We know he was born in Veles in what is today North Macedonia and lived in Italy. He was apparently a professor on multiple universities yet no reliable records of his academic career exist. In fact, his claim about the Vinča writing was not published in a book, but instead presented in a number of newspaper articles which were only composed into a book in 1995 after Pešić's death. Pešić claimed that the Vinča script has 26 letters but the evidence he presents is...rather questionable. He literally says that he studied the Vinča fragments in detail and...that is it. That is Pešić's evidence. His study of the fragments. I mean, okay, but he was making some bold claims: one would guess that such claims would need more evidence that an interpretation of the fragments made by a man whose academic credibility is rather questionable. And his further analysis proved that other writing systems descended from the Vinča script. In fact, we know that an important part of Pešić's biography is a lie. He was apparently forced to leave Yugoslavia because of his claims yet a 1987 poll conducted among archeologists in Yugoslavia showed that most of them had never even heard about Pešić.

So, Vinča script is an interesting idea, but ultimately only a myth popularized by the rising Serbian nationalism of the 1990s and believed to this day.
 
Likes: Futurist
Nov 2018
343
Denmark
#2
The so called Vinca script consists of 5,421 different signs and are often inscribed in rows with clusters of signs and different signs reappearing in the clusters, as they would, have it been a written language.
Harald Haarmann a German linguist believes there are many similarities between "Old European script" and Minoan hieroglyphs and Linear A.
However, it is also limited in how many ways you can draw lines and similarities will arise whether they have a common origin or it is random.
Whatever it is, a symbolic script to communicate with the gods or an actual alphabet probably with the same purpose, one thing it is not, it is not an ancestor to some newer alphabets and the language would have been an non-Indo-European language.
The Vinca culture disappeared around 4200 BC and then some dude means the alphabet arose in its purest form when the Slavs arrived on the Balkan.
I think all nations have their stoners who believe that the cradle of mankind and civilization stood in exactly their hometown.
 
Jul 2017
292
Srpska
#5
The statement is wrong?

Yes, because you are politicizing like a fool when the inquiry is not political. This is the inquiry.
1. Whether the symbols constitute a script (like Mayan symbols or hieroglyphs etc.)
2. Whether the symbols form the basis for subsequent scripts.

For example this:






And there is no room for your stoner political garbage. No, you cannot sht on Serbia and Serbians. We are better than your sorry terrorist ass.

You want to talk politics? You are not a Serb, you are Croatian terrorist monkey!
 
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Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,374
Republika Srpska
#6
1. Lay off with the insults.

2. The arguments around Vinča writing cannot be separated from nationalism because the belief about Vinča script is mostly held by ultranationalists who use it to declare Serbs the oldest people in Europe. It is a nationalistic theory. It is not an accident that Etruscans supposedly called themselves Rascians according to the proponents of the theory. Rascian is an old term used to describe Serbs so the theory pretty much states that Etruscans were Serbs.
 
Nov 2018
343
Denmark
#9
I think the Vinca culture is amazing and I have to admit that Marija Gimbutas was my entry into it.
As far as I know, she is still a controversial researcher, but I think recent research has shown that she was not so far fetched as earlier believed.
Sadly enough the research is the science " Who Must Not Be Named" here on Historum .
Nevertheless, older and recent excavations have at least revealed a fantastic culture and the Vinca script is a fascinating aspect of it.
It would be great fun to discuss it ,so couldn’t we start all over again and leave let's say the last 6,000 years history out of it.
 
Likes: Kotromanic
Jul 2017
292
Srpska
#10
Hoo, it's not so much my place to say it but I will: you are asking for a vacation from the site!
That's fine.
This little pos monkey opens a quasi historical question just to sht on Serbs, he will hear from me! Full force! He is a fkn piece of sht terrorist, and that is his only goal as expressed in his last sentence.. He does not give two fks about Vinca.