Wallis Simpson and UK

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,212
#2
She was from nice family. She had wealthy and prominent relatives and went to good private schools. I don't think she was in the social register, and wasn't from what was considered the highest class in the US. She wasn't from the kind of background considered appropriate to marry royalty, and probably no one American was. However, the reason the king had to abdicate was that she was twice divorced.

Her parents were married 5 months before she was born. Her father died a few months after she was born, which raises questions whether she was just illegitimate and there was a made up marriage.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,212
#5
Wallis Simpson wasn't acceptable for various reasons. First of all, I don't think she could have been married by the Church of England being divorced. Like many other things, it is similar to Roman Catholic, but not as strict. Furthermore, she and her husband were introduced to Prince Edward, and she began an affair with the prince while living with her husband.

Her background also wasn't considered acceptable then. For example Prince Phillip was already a prince of a foreign country. Princess Diana was not royalty, but near the top of British aristocracy.

Wallis was called a whore and a social climber, and was disliked by the British upper class. Times have changed and I don't know if a prince then would have considered marrying someone from an ordinary middle class background.
 

Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,074
Dispargum
#7
There were people who did not like Edward, but as far as I know it was not for his politics. The Archbishop of Canterbury was a leader of the abdication effort, but I'm pretty sure he was motivated by Edward's low moral standards, not his politics. At the time of the abdication, Churchill was the only one who saw Hitler and Mussolini as major threats.
 

GogLais

Ad Honorem
Sep 2013
5,397
Wirral
#8
There were people who did not like Edward, but as far as I know it was not for his politics. The Archbishop of Canterbury was a leader of the abdication effort, but I'm pretty sure he was motivated by Edward's low moral standards, not his politics. At the time of the abdication, Churchill was the only one who saw Hitler and Mussolini as major threats.
And of course Churchill supported EdVIII.
 
Likes: Chlodio

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,212
#9
Being from a country with no titled aristocracy and less clear class lines than Britain, Wallis could make people abroad think she was from a fancier background than she was. The were like 30,000 people in the social register, and she was not from that background.

Her first husband was a naval officer and she was apparently very active when he was away. She had affairs with ambassadors and apparently was interested in upper class, wealthy, and prominent men. She had the profile for a mistress of a prince, not a wife.

At the time, many viewed her as causing a crisis to further her own ambition. Being from the US, she didn't have the same attitude a British subject would have about knowing her place.

Prince Charles wanted to marry Camilla, but she wasn't high enough up in the British elite, and was older than him. They made up a list of girls from the right background, who there wasn't much talk about their prior relationships, it seemed like they wouldn't cause trouble, and would play the role of pricess and queen well.

Hence, they got Diana. The semi arranged marriage didn't work well. They also figured that someone for whom being a princess was a bigger step up would go be less likely to cause trouble. So they let the princes marry whomever they wanted.
 
Jan 2017
1,276
Durham
#10
What do we know exactly about the origins of Wallis Simpson ?
It would depend on your background in "the UK".

The aristocracy and upper classes count for say 1% of the population. There's a healthy Middle Class but most of us are from Working Class backgrounds.

Documentaries about Mrs Simpson are showed regularly here and most of us would side with her. Not that we really care one way or the other.
 

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