War Movie Miscellany

May 2011
548
New Iberia, La.
#91
TRIVIA - RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP

  • imdb
  • 1. Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster did not get along during the shoot. Lancaster made jokes about Gable’s age. Gable refused to work past 5 and would leave in the middle of a scene. Since Lancaster was a co-producer and the film ran overtime and overbudget, this became frustrating. Gable did not want to play a captain that lost his command, he felt it did not fit his image. He sat out two days over this issue and only returned when the script was changed so the captain lost command because of a head injury. (Another example of an actor insisting on something that made the plot worse.)
  • 2. The actual Akikaze did not play the role of a hunter as depicted in the movie. It was sunk when it purposely intercepted a torpedo aimed at the carrier Junyo it was escorting.
  • 3. The actors in the sub crew went through training on how to run a sub. The movie has been commended for its accurate depiction of the attack procedure.
  • 4. The older/younger commander dynamic was used again by director Wise for the first “Star Trek” movie. He used the stationary subs hunting each other in his “Wrath of Khan”.
  • 5. This was Don Rickles’ first film. He was on a motor torpedo boat tender in WWII. He was in charge of morale. Just kidding.
  • 6. The movie starts off badly with Richardson’s previous boat being sunk in Bungo Straits early in the war. First, a U.S. sub would not have been that deep into Japanese waters at that time and if it was, there is no way the crew could have been rescued.

  • Wikipedia
  • 7. The author Edward Beach did not like the movie. He once commented that all the studio did was buy the title.
  • 8. The movie was basically a combination of “Moby Dick” (with the Akikaze being the white whale) and “Mutiny on the Bounty” (with its command dysfunction).

  • TCM
  • 9. The movie was overshadowed at the box office by “Operation Petticoat”.
5431fa64ab9c260f9452c610efe8a378[1].jpg
 
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Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,651
Australia
#93
TRIVIA - RUN SILENT, RUN DEEP

  • imdb
  • 1. Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster did not get along during the shoot. Lancaster made jokes about Gable’s age. Gable refused to work past 5 and would leave in the middle of a scene. Since Lancaster was a co-producer and the film ran overtime and overbudget, this became frustrating. Gable did not want to play a captain that lost his command, he felt it did not fit his image. He sat out two days over this issue and only returned when the script was changed so the captain lost command because of a head injury. (Another example of an actor insisting on something that made the plot worse.)
  • 2. The actual Akikaze did not play the role of a hunter as depicted in the movie. It was sunk when it purposely intercepted a torpedo aimed at the carrier Junyo it was escorting.
  • 3. The actors in the sub crew went through training on how to run a sub. The movie has been commended for its accurate depiction of the attack procedure.
  • 4. The older/younger commander dynamic was used again by director Wise for the first “Star Trek” movie. He used the stationary subs hunting each other in his “Wrath of Khan”.
  • 5. This was Don Rickles’ first film. He was on a motor torpedo boat tender in WWII. He was in charge of morale. Just kidding.
  • 6. The movie starts off badly with Richardson’s previous boat being sunk in Bungo Straits early in the war. First, a U.S. sub would not have been that deep into Japanese waters at that time and if it was, there is no way the crew could have been rescued.

  • Wikipedia
  • 7. The author Edward Beach did not like the movie. He once commented that all the studio did was buy the title.
  • 8. The movie was basically a combination of “Moby Dick” (with the Akikaze being the white whale) and “Mutiny on the Bounty” (with its command dysfunction).

  • TCM
  • 9. The movie was overshadowed at the box office by “Operation Petticoat”.
View attachment 20610
'Operation Petticoat' was the more accurate of the two. ;)
 
May 2011
548
New Iberia, La.
#94
FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION - REGENERATION

“Regeneration” is a war movie released in 1997. It was a British-Canadian production. It was released in America as “Behind the Lines”, but was lost in the wake of “Saving Private Ryan” and "The Thin Red Line". It is based on the acclaimed novel by Pat Barker. Although based on a work of fiction, it features several historical figures and is based on actual events. You can say that a vast majority of war films are anti-war, but few are as serious about sending that message as this film.

The movie begins with an awesome tracking shot over no man’s land to set the mood of “war is Hell”. Don’t be fooled by the opening – this is far from an action picture. Words substitute for bullets and what words. The movie is very lyrical and not just because of the poetry which is effectively blended in. Kudos to Allan Scott for staying true to the novel and to director Gillies MacKinnon for bringing it to the screen.

This is an excellent movie. It was nominated for the BAFTA for Best Picture, but is virtually unknown in America. This is a shame because the movie is only lacking in action. It is well written. It is intelligent. It is very well acted (especially by Pryce). The cinematography is interesting. Some of the scenes are done in a surreal style. It sheds a light on the mental wounds of war and treatment of those traumas. If you have seen standard WWI combat films, this movie should be required viewing to take you “behind the lines”. If you insist your war movies be seen and not heard, skip it.

regeneration-movie-poster-1997-1020344790[1].jpg
 
May 2011
548
New Iberia, La.
#98
BACK-STORY - Saving Private Ryan

“Saving Private Ryan” originated from writer Robert Rodat seeing a monument to eight siblings killed in the Civil War. He brought the idea to producer Mark Gordon. The movie was a huge critical and box office success. Made for around $70 million, it made over $480 million and was the highest grossing film of the year. The Omaha Beach set and reenactment cost $12 million and used 1,500 extras (including amputees) and 40 gallons of fake blood. The Ramelle set was built from scratch, including the bridge and the river. It was nominated for 11 Academy Awards and won 5 (Cinematography, Sound, Sound Editing, Film Editing, and Director). Incredibly it lost Best Picture to “Shakespeare in Love” in the most egregious miscarriage in Oscar history. Almost as perplexing was Hanks’ loss to Roberto Bergnini. The movie is currently #71 on AFI’s list of greatest movies of all time.
 
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May 2011
548
New Iberia, La.
#99
TRIVIA - The Alamo (1960)

classic movie hub
1. Chill Wills took out a tasteless ad in Variety to push for the Best Supporting Actor Oscar. The ad claimed the crew were praying more for Wills’ victory than the defenders in the Alamo were praying to survive. There was such a backlash that Wayne had to take out a counter ad. Wills lost to Peter Ustinov from “Spartacus”. It would have taken more than a brilliant ad to change that outcome.
2. Charleston Heston turned down the role of Bowie partly because his moderate Democratic political philosophy (at the time) clashed with Wayne’s conservatism. Also, he was skeptical about Wayne as a first-time director. He later regretted the decision. Clark Gable turned down the Travis role.
3. Wayne and Richard Widmark did not get along. It started when Wayne called him “Dick” to try to bond and Widmark coldly insisted on Richard. After that Wayne emphasized “Richard”. It did not help that Widmark was a liberal Democrat who supported civil rights and gun control and was opposed to black-listing. He also questioned Wayne’s directorial talents.
4. Wayne, who felt guilty about avoiding WWII, saw the movie as his way to join the fight against communism. That’s why the movie has a big liberty and democracy theme.
5. Wayne wanted to play the small role of Sam Houston so he could concentrate on directing, but the studio insisted he take on a bigger role to boost the box office potential.
6. Wayne was all-in for the movie and went into his own pocket to pay for cost overruns. He did not recoup his money until the TV rights were sold years later.
7. During filming, a cannon rolled over Laurence Harvey’s foot breaking it. Harvey finished the scene.
8. The production used 7,000 extras, 1,500 horses, and 400 cattle.
9. The set took two years to construct and became a major tourist attraction. It was used in over 200 Westerns.
10. Bowie’s seven-barreled gun was called a Nock Volley Gun and developed for use in the Royal Navy. It had limited use because the kick was more than most men cared to endure.

imdb
11. The movie was banned in Mexico.
12. Wayne intended to shoot the film in Mexico until the Daughters of the Republic of Texas threatened him with tanking the film in Texas theaters.
13. After a few weeks of release, the movie was cut by 30 minutes.
14. Wayne hired Frankie Avalon because of the successful casting of Ricky Nelson in “Rio Bravo”.

Wikipedia
15. Several days in, Widmark wanted to drop out because he felt he was not right for playing the much larger Bowie.
16. Historians James Frank Dobie and Lon Tinkle insisted their names be removed from the credits.
17. The movie won the Academy Award for Sound. It was nominated for Supporting Actor, Cinematography, Editing, Music, Picture (losing to “The Apartment”), and Song (“The Green Leaves of Summer”).

TCM
18. Sammy Davis, Jr. wanted to play the slave, but his controversial marriage to a white woman nixed it.
19. It had a crew of 342.
20. It was the only film Wayne directed.
21. John Ford showed up on set and started giving Wayne advice. Wayne solved the problem by sending Ford off to do some second unit shooting of Mexican cavalry. Most of which did not make it into the film.
 
Jan 2018
334
Sturgeon Lake Mn.
In Brian Hubberman's documentary of the making of the Waynamo a couple of cast members insist that scenes in which they were directed by Ford are in the picture.

The documentary in full length was included on the MGM special laserdisc of the restored premier version of the picture. That was the last laserdisc I kept. A shorter form of the documentary is on the DVD.

MGM has a 70mm print of the original premier version from which the LD was made but rumor has it that it was ruined when MGM applied a chemical preservative to it. Robert Harris, who has restored Spartacus and Lawrence of Arabia, wanted to restore the Waynamo but apparently both money and will were lacking and nothing came of it. Too bad
 
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