War Movie Miscellany

May 2011
547
New Iberia, La.
#21
BACK-STORY - Das Boot

“Das Boot” (“The Boat”) is a German submarine movie directed by Wolfgang Petersen. Originally the movie was going to be made by John Sturges starring Robert Redford and then by Don Siegel starring Paul Newman. Thankfully, both projects fell through. It is based on the novel by Lothar-Gunther Buchheim. Although fictional, Buchheim used his experience as a correspondent on U-96 on a tour in 1941. The Werner (Herbert Gronemeyer) character is based on Buchheim. Buchheim began as a technical adviser, but had a falling out with Petersen because of what Buchheim considered unrealistically enhanced dramatic license. The movie took three years to produce (1979-81) and was the most expensive German film up to then. It was released in 1981 at 150 minutes and then shown as a miniseries at 300 minutes. The version I am reviewing is the definitive Director’s Cut which clocks in at 209 minutes. The original version was a big hit in Germany and the U.S. It was an even bigger critical success. It was nominated for Academy Awards for Director, Cinematography, Adapted Screenplay (Petersen), Film Editing, Sound, and Sound Effects Editing. Stunningly, it was not nominated for Foreign Film.
 
May 2011
547
New Iberia, La.
#24
BACK-STORY - Letters from Iwo Jima

“Letters from Iwo Jima” is Clint Eastwood’s companion piece to “Flags of Our Fathers”. They were filmed back to back. It is the Battle of Iwo Jima from the Japanese perspective. It is based on the letters of the Japanese commander Gen. Tadamichi Kuribayashi and the book So Sad to Fall in Battle by Kumiko Kakehashi. The movie was filmed in California with a one day shoot on Iwo Jima. The film was well received by critics and made numerous top ten lists. It was a big hit in Japan, but did not do very well in the States (those damned subtitles!). It was nominated for Academy Awards for Picture, Director and Original Screenplay and won for Sound Effects. The original title was supposed to be “Red Sun, Black Sand” ( which was apparently too cool ).
 
Likes: Edratman

Edratman

Ad Honorem
Feb 2009
6,602
Eastern PA
#25
BACK-STORY - Letters from Iwo Jima

“Letters from Iwo Jima” is Clint Eastwood’s companion piece to “Flags of Our Fathers”. They were filmed back to back. It is the Battle of Iwo Jima from the Japanese perspective. It is based on the letters of the Japanese commander Gen. Tadamichi Kuribayashi and the book So Sad to Fall in Battle by Kumiko Kakehashi. The movie was filmed in California with a one day shoot on Iwo Jima. The film was well received by critics and made numerous top ten lists. It was a big hit in Japan, but did not do very well in the States (those damned subtitles!). It was nominated for Academy Awards for Picture, Director and Original Screenplay and won for Sound Effects. The original title was supposed to be “Red Sun, Black Sand” ( which was apparently too cool ).
Very good movie.
 
May 2011
547
New Iberia, La.
#28
Trivia - “Manchurian Candidate”

mentalfloss
1. United Artists did not want to make the film because of the political controversy. Frank Sinatra went to Pres. Kennedy who was a big fan of the novel. Kennedy contacted the studio head and got him to change his mind.
2. Angela Lansbury was only three years older than her “son” Laurence Harvey.
3. The movie came out in the midst of the Cuban Missile Crisis.
4. When Marco visits Raymond in his hotel room towards the end of the film, Sinatra is filmed out of focus. Critics lauded this cinematography for showing Raymond’s distorted perspective. Actually, the assistant cameraman screwed up the shot and director Frankenheimer was upset and wanted to reshoot it, but he could not get Sinatra to duplicate the performance.
5. Sinatra wanted Lucille Ball for the Angela Lansbury role.
6. Sinatra broke a finger in the fight scene with Henry Silva. Later, when he was up for Dirty Harry, he could not grip the pistol properly and had to drop out.
7. When Laurence Harvey jumped in the lake in Central Park it was so cold that ice had to be broken.
8. The myth that the movie was pulled after the assassination of Kennedy was not true. It was shown, but rarely because there was not a lot of interest in the film.
imdb
9. In the novel, the relationship between Raymond and his mother is more incestuous and she even seduces him. The movie could only go as far as a kiss on the lips. (Surprisingly, the 2004 remake does not even have the kiss.)
Wikipedia
10. Mrs. Iselin is #21 on AFI’s list of 100 Heroes and Villains.
hero_EB19880311REVIEWS803110301AR[1].jpg
 
Likes: Edratman

Similar History Discussions