War Movie Miscellany

May 2011
547
New Iberia, La.
#35
BACK-STORY - Das Boot

“Das Boot” (“The Boat”) is a German submarine movie directed by Wolfgang Petersen. Originally the movie was going to be made by John Sturges starring Robert Redford and then by Don Siegel starring Paul Newman. Thankfully, both projects fell through. It is based on the novel by Lothar-Gunther Buchheim. Although fictional, Buchheim used his experience as a correspondent on U-96 on a tour in 1941. The Werner (Herbert Gronemeyer) character is based on Buchheim. Buchheim began as a technical adviser, but had a falling out with Petersen because of what Buchheim considered unrealistically enhanced dramatic license. The movie took three years to produce (1979-81) and was the most expensive German film up to then. It was released in 1981 at 150 minutes and then shown as a miniseries at 300 minutes. The version I am reviewing is the definitive Director’s Cut which clocks in at 209 minutes. The original version was a big hit in Germany and the U.S. It was an even bigger critical success. It was nominated for Academy Awards for Director, Cinematography, Adapted Screenplay (Petersen), Film Editing, Sound, and Sound Effects Editing. Stunningly, it was not nominated for Foreign Film.
 
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Edratman

Ad Honorem
Feb 2009
6,602
Eastern PA
#36
BACK-STORY - Das Boot

“Das Boot” (“The Boat”) is a German submarine movie directed by Wolfgang Petersen. Originally the movie was going to be made by John Sturges starring Robert Redford and then by Don Siegel starring Paul Newman. Thankfully, both projects fell through. It is based on the novel by Lothar-Gunther Buchheim. Although fictional, Buchheim used his experience as a correspondent on U-96 on a tour in 1941. The Werner (Herbert Gronemeyer) character is based on Buchheim. Buchheim began as a technical adviser, but had a falling out with Petersen because of what Buchheim considered unrealistically enhanced dramatic license. The movie took three years to produce (1979-81) and was the most expensive German film up to then. It was released in 1981 at 150 minutes and then shown as a miniseries at 300 minutes. The version I am reviewing is the definitive Director’s Cut which clocks in at 209 minutes. The original version was a big hit in Germany and the U.S. It was an even bigger critical success. It was nominated for Academy Awards for Director, Cinematography, Adapted Screenplay (Petersen), Film Editing, Sound, and Sound Effects Editing. Stunningly, it was not nominated for Foreign Film.
I saw the film (150 minute) in an arts theater in Providence, RI in 1981 and was simply amazed. The 5 hour version was on cable a few years later and it was too long and too much.
 
Mar 2019
1,247
Kansas
#37
I saw the film (150 minute) in an arts theater in Providence, RI in 1981 and was simply amazed. The 5 hour version was on cable a few years later and it was too long and too much.
I saw the 209 minute version a couple of years ago. It was nice layering of the story, but nothing dramatic that could advance the narrative occurred. Mind you 150 minutes was more than enough to see what a desperate horrible experience being on a U boat was during WW2.
 
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Oct 2016
114
Ashland
#38
The Bridges At Toko-Ri
a mediocre film, imo.

Howzabout Gods and Generals?
Strong interpretation of Stonewall Jackson by Stephen Lang

Rough Riders
very entertaining gonzo version of the Spanish-American war with memorable performances, esp the over-the-top portrayal of T.R.

The single 'war' movie of those I have seen that benefitted the most from the Extended, Director's Cut treatment is Kingdom of Heaven.
Almost a different film with all the added subplots and backstories.
 
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May 2011
547
New Iberia, La.
#39
TRIVIA - The Bridges of Toko-Ri

imdb
1. William Holden learned how to taxi a jet on the carrier deck for close-ups.
2. The US Navy cooperated with 19 ships, including the USS Oriskany ( and when it was no longer available, the USS Kearsarge). The Oriskany was later sunk as an artificial reef off Pensacola, Florida and is a popular diving site.
3. James Michener wrote the novel after spending time on the USS Essex during the Korean War. Neil Armstrong was a pilot at the time. The incident involving the bombing of bridges and the rescue of a downed pilot was based on actual events. However, the downed pilot and his attempted rescuer were actually captured and survived the war.
4. Holden’s brother was a navy pilot in WWII who was killed in action.
5. In the book, the jet is the F2H Banshee, not the F9F Panther. The Panther was probably substituted because it was more photogenic.
6. Holden insisted the novel’s ending be retained. He did not want the typical Hollywood happy ending. This worked well because although the movie came at the end of a wave of WWII/Korean War formulaic offerings, it stood out.
Wikipedia
7. The movie won the Oscar for Best Special Effects and was nominated for Best Editing.
TCM
8. Holden and Grace Kelly conducted an affair during the shoot. This was not uncommon for him, even though he was married. When Kelly invited her to her home, her father shook his fist at Holden and evidenced his displeasure with the affair. Holden left the house upset. The affair did not continue after the movie was finished.
9. Mickey Rooney got the role partly due to his friendship with Michener. One day, Rooney was needed for an unscheduled scene, but could not be found. He turned up later as co-pilot of a jet having bribed the pilot to fly him to Tokyo for the horse races.
1955-The-Bridges-at-Toko-Ri-02[1].jpg
 
May 2011
547
New Iberia, La.
#40
QUOTE - “When I go home people will ask me, ‘Hey Hoot, why do you do it man? What, you some kinda war junkie?’ You know what I’ll say? I won’t say a goddamn word. Why? They won’t understand. They won’t understand why we do it. They won’t understand that it’s about the men next to you, and that’s it. That’s all it is.” — Norman “Hoot” Hooten, “Black Hawk Down” (2001)

Eric-Bana[1].jpg
 
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