War of Secession and foreigners

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,889
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#2
Wait, be accurate: the definition "war of Secession" is not clear at international level. In Italy it's the American Civil War, but in US they don't talk about a "war of Secession".

Can you be more specific?
 
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sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,828
Sydney
#3
plenty and on both side , some notable ones were the prince duke of Polignac , fighting for the Confederate in Texas , much appreciated by swooning maiden
his soldiers much taken by his unbridled aggressive style called him " polecat "

Sigel and Cleeburn might not qualifies as they were American citizens , though foreign born

also a Prussian artillerist , fighting for the Federals who palliated his lack of English by training his crew to perform by the clapping of his hands
he ranged the battlefield pretty much as it pleased him , pretending not to understand when told to stay in position ,
with his rifled Parrot gun he even bagged Bishop general Polk
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,294
#5
There were many European volunteers, but it wasn't that signficant.

In the War of Independence, there were senior officers from Europe, particularly France, Poland, Germany, and Ireland. There were only a few Americans with experience as British Army officers. Washington, Greene, Arnold, and Morgan were all militia officers at the start of the war. Washington had significant expereince commanding fairly large numbers in combat, but the others had little relevant experience. Therefore, experienced European officers were important
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,889
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#6
Sorry.In France it is the name used,"the war of Secession,between the nordists and the sudists".
Ok, it's the same in Italy.

So I can add a piece of historical information: the US Administration offered to General Giuseppe Garibaldi the Command of the Northern Army, but the "Hero of the Two Worlds" was already quite busy in South America ...
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,294
#7
plenty and on both side , some notable ones were the prince duke of Polignac , fighting for the Confederate in Texas , much appreciated by swooning maiden
his soldiers much taken by his unbridled aggressive style called him " polecat "
From what I read, they called him polecat partly because they couldn't pronounce Polignac. He was also called Prince Polecat.
 
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Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,320
Dispargum
#8
In the American Civil War there were many examples of soldiers on both sides that had been born in other countries, Ireland and Germany in particular, but who had immigrated to America before the war and were for the most part already American citizens. One such famous Confederate was General Patrick Cleborne, born in Ireland. Off the top of my head I don't recall any mercenaries per se nor was there much recruiting overseas. Even at the end of the war the North had untapped manpower reserves. The South ran out of men toward the end of the war, but by then the blockade would have made it difficult to bring in large numbers of foreign troops. The South also had money problems which would have hindered the hiring of mercenaries. Instead, the South at the very end resorted to recruiting slaves.

When the North passed its draft law it allowed a drafted man to hire a substitute from among those men who were not eligible for the draft. Only citizens were eligible for the draft, so substitutes were mostly non-citizens. There were plenty of non-citizens living in the North without having to find a substitute overseas. Recent immigrants had not yet completed the naturalization process.
 
Jul 2009
9,955
#10
Ok, it's the same in Italy.

So I can add a piece of historical information: the US Administration offered to General Giuseppe Garibaldi the Command of the Northern Army, but the "Hero of the Two Worlds" was already quite busy in South America ...
I believe the "great revolutionary" was offered a general's commission, but declared he would only accept if given supreme command. That was not an option for the United States, so...no Garibaldi.

Whenever Garibaldi became involved with the International and became identified with communists is not known to me, but in 1870-71 he was pretty well connected to all that (support for Paris Commune, etc.). Despite his popularity in Europe, he may have become a suspicious figure in the US.
 
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