Was ancient science and technology really so advanced?

Nov 2015
45
Regnum Hiemis
Was ancient science and technology so advanced? Most of the people claim people would go to the Moon earlier if there would be no Medieval Ages. What are your toughts?
 
Mar 2013
1,441
Escandinavia y Mesopotamia
Who are ”most of the people”? – Those idiots who rely uncritically on outdated and erroneous works from 1700’s?, or on popular misconceptions as I did for about 8 years ago before I entered Gymnasium(High School) and learned proper actual history? - Because ”most of the people” also think that Abraham Lincoln liberated the African-Americans from slavery or that people thought that the earth was flat in Middle Ages.

Tim O’neill, who is a red-hair Irish-Australian atheist has done an excellent summarization of the synthesis of the scholars and historians:

https://historyforatheists.com/2016/11/the-dark-ages-popery-periodisation-and-pejoratives/

Read specific Tim’s posts:

https://www.quora.com/Why-did-science-make-little-real-progress-in-Europe-in-the-Middle-Ages-3

https://www.quora.com/How-has-the-burning-of-the-Library-of-Alexandria-affected-the-world-and-where-would-we-be-if-it-never-happened

In case you want scholarship the work of Ronald Number’s “Galileo goes to jail and other myths about science and religion” there are some chapters that address(and debunks) the issues you are raising.

In short: The dynamic Middle Ages of Europe was a dynamic and varied period with fantastic innovations and progressions in various fields such of mathematic, architecture, agriculture, philosophy, medicine, and practical science.
 
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Aug 2016
926
Ireland, Dublin
In short: The dynamic Middle Ages of Europe was a dynamic and varied period with fantastic innovations and progressions in various fields such of mathematic, architecture, agriculture, philosophy, medicine, and practical science.
Albeit very late middle ages.
 
Aug 2016
926
Ireland, Dublin
When it comes to Ancient knowledge and technology places like the Harrapan civilisation appear to have been quite knowledgeable on things scientists only discovered within the last 200 years
 
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Aug 2016
926
Ireland, Dublin
Can you elaborate?
Yes

https://learnodo-newtonic.com/indus-valley-civilization-facts

#4 It had a more advanced sanitation system than many contemporary urban cities

The cities of Indus Valley Civilization had world’s first known urban sanitation systems. All houses were equipped with latrines, bathing houses, and sewage drains which emptied into wider public drains and ultimately deposited the fertile sludge on surrounding agricultural fields. Some houses were even equipped with the world’s earliest known flush toilets. Most houses had private wells and there was a sophisticated water management system with numerous reservoirs. All these points indicate the importance of hygiene in IVC and their marvelous skills in hydraulic engineering. The sewerage and drainage system of Harappan civilization was more advanced than that of most western cities before the twentieth century and even that of many contemporary urban cities in the developing world.
 
Mar 2013
1,441
Escandinavia y Mesopotamia
Albeit very late middle ages.
Not quite really. The Byzantines progressed already from the very beginning in 395 CE and onwards as they managed to repel the "barbarians" from Germany successfully, so their institutions were not destroyed as it happened to its western counterpart. The rest of Europe did not progress much from the time span of 500-700 CE as it was floated with "barbarians" from Germany, but from around year 800 CE when Charlemagne initiated the Carolingian Renaissance a tremendous transformation occurred in early middle ages, and culminated in high middle ages where it spread to the rest of Europe.
 
Nov 2015
45
Regnum Hiemis
When it comes to Ancient knowledge and technology places like the Harrapan civilisation appear to have been quite knowledgeable on things scientists only discovered within the last 200 years
Can you explain? It's not my area of expertise, so I would like to learn.

By the way I was mostly asking about Ancient Greek-Roman civilisation vs Medieval European, Byzantine and Islamic civilisations.
 
May 2013
395
Hays Kansas (ex Australian)
Not quite really. The Byzantines progressed already from the very beginning in 395 CE and onwards as they managed to repel the "barbarians" from Germany successfully, so their institutions were not destroyed as it happened to its western counterpart. The rest of Europe did not progress much from the time span of 500-700 CE as it was floated with "barbarians" from Germany, but from around year 800 CE when Charlemagne initiated the Carolingian Renaissance a tremendous transformation occurred in early middle ages, and culminated in high middle ages where it spread to the rest of Europe.
Which neatly explains why the Dark Ages is such a Euro centric term, and further why the vast majority of historians have abandoned using the term