Was Fascism a French origin invention? (TIMEGHOST history withy Indy Niedel)

Jul 2019
160
Pale Blue Dot - Moonshine Quadrant
A definition issue will rise up here I suspect – although I thought the video was good.

In his The Roots of National Socialism Rohan Butler pointed that Fichte’s 1800 book The Closed Commercial State was a clear statement on his metaphysical concept of state totality.

Hayek saw the roots of National Socialism in people like Fichte, Rodbertus, and Lassalle.

The Italian Futurists were certainly forerunners.

The potential for totalitarian state was clear with Rousseau, who took Sparta and Plato for inspiration.

A number of people have pointed toward Plato’s Republic and still others at Hegel with his combination of history, God, and the political state

The French poet Heinrich Heine show an awareness as far back as 1834:

“Christianity - and that is its greatest merit - has somewhat mitigated that brutal Germanic love of war, but it could not destroy it. Should that subduing talisman, the cross, be shattered, the frenzied madness of the ancient warriors, that insane Berserk rage of which Nordic bards have spoken and sung so often, will once more burst into flame. This talisman is fragile, and the day will come when it will collapse miserably. Then the ancient stony gods will rise from the forgotten debris and rub the dust of a thousand years from their eyes, and finally Thor with his giant hammer will jump up and smash the Gothic cathedrals. ... Do not smile at the visionary who anticipates the same revolution in the realm of the visible as has taken place in the spiritual. Thought precedes action as lightning precedes thunder. German thunder is of true Germanic character; it is not very nimble, but rumbles along ponderously. Yet, it will come and when you hear a crashing such as never before has been heard in the world's history, then you know that the German thunderbolt has fallen at last. At that uproar the eagles of the air will drop dead, and lions in the remotest deserts of Africa will hide in their royal dens. A play will be performed in Germany which will make the French Revolution look like an innocent idyll.”

So did Tocqueville in 1840:

I think that the species of oppression by which democratic nations are menaced is unlike anything that ever before existed in the world; our contemporaries will find no prototype of it in their memories. I seek in vain for an expression that will accurately convey the whole of the idea I have formed of it; the old words despotism and tyranny are inappropriate: the thing itself is new, and, since I cannot name it, I must attempt to define it.

I seek to trace the novel features under which despotism may appear in the world. The first thing that strikes the observation is an innumerable multitude of men, all equal and alike, incessantly endeavouring to procure the petty and paltry pleasures with which they glut their fives. Each of them, living apart, is as a stranger to the fate of all the rest; his children and his private friends constitute to him the whole of mankind. As for the rest of his fellow citizens, he is close to them, but he does not see them; he touches them, but he does not feel them; he exists only in himself and for himself alone; and if his kindred still remain to him, he may be said at any rate to have lost his country.

Above this race of men stands an immense and tutelary power, which takes upon itself alone to secure their gratifications and to watch over their fate. That power is absolute, minute, regular, provident and mild. It would be like the authority of a parent if, like that authority, its object was to prepare men for manhood; but it seeks, on the contrary, to keep them in a perpetual state of childhood: it is well content that people should rejoice, provided they think of nothing but rejoicing. For their happiness such a government willingly labors, but it chooses to be the sole agent and the only arbiter of that happiness; it provides for their security, foresees and supplies their necessities, facilitates their pleasures, manages their principal concerns, directs their industry, regulates the descent of property, and subdivides their inheritances: what remains, but to spare them all the care of thinking and all the trouble of living?

I have always thought that servitude of the regular, quiet, and gentle kind which I have just described might be combined more easily than is commonly believed with some of the outward forms of freedom, and that it might even establish itself under the wing of the sovereignty of the people”
 
Jul 2012
783
Australia
No man is an island entire of itself,
Every man is a piece of the continent,
A part of the main.

If a clod be washed away by the sea,
Europe is the less,
As well as if a promontory were,
As well as any manor of thy friend's,
Or of thine own were.

Any man's death diminishes me,
Because I am involved in mankind.
And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
It tolls for thee.

John Donne (1572-1631).
Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions and Seuerall Steps in my Sicknes - Meditation XVII, 1624
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
6,094
It is my understanding that he migrated to France fairly young and stayed there for the rest of his life.
At age 34. He only lived to be 59, and he ended up staying in Paris because his writings were banned in Prussia in 1833 and the wider German League in 1835. He was also very ill for most of his last decades in Paris.

So absolutely a German poet, writing in German, and one particularly hated by a certain group of German "patriots"... – since he was also Jewish.
 
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Jan 2020
130
cumberstone
At age 34. He only lived to be 59, and he ended up staying in Paris because his writings were banned in Prussia in 1833 and the wider German League in 1835. He was also very ill for most of his last decades in Paris.

So absolutely a German poet, writing in German, and one particularly hated by a certain group of German "patriots"... – since he was also Jewish.
Why do you rotatig around Heine?