Was Germany in a position to be a hegemon in 1938?

Nov 2014
287
ph
#1
Say if Germany did not violate the Munich agreement, with more than 80 million people, was Germany in 1938 in a position to be a continental hegemon? Maybe they decide to take the Polish Corridor in the long run, but the Sudetenland will be it for the medium term? How valid were Germany's annexations before 1939?
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,450
Iowa USA
#2
The 80 million population if anything was perceived as a liability by the Nazi regime. So that part of the first sentence confused me to be honest.

As in the 1905-1914 era, the English speaking world dominated trade and finance. No nation could replace the hegemony of New York and London based on being more powerful, militarily and financially, than medium to minor powers like Hungary, Poland, Italy. So, briefly, "no".

Leaving aside the question of the medium to long term competition with the Soviet "experiment".
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,571
SoCal
#3
The 80 million population if anything was perceived as a liability by the Nazi regime. So that part of the first sentence confused me to be honest.
I thought that the Nazis were happy with the size of their population and wanted more Lebensraum so that their population could grow even further?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,571
SoCal
#4
Say if Germany did not violate the Munich agreement, with more than 80 million people, was Germany in 1938 in a position to be a continental hegemon? Maybe they decide to take the Polish Corridor in the long run, but the Sudetenland will be it for the medium term? How valid were Germany's annexations before 1939?
So, no Memel annexation?

Anyway, I do think that Germany would be capable of being an economic juggernaut in such a scenario if it would have actually continuously adopted sensible economic policies. Based on its population and high average IQ potential, it is likely to become the second-largest or third-largest economy in the world by the late 20th century--depending on how exactly developments in Japan will go. Of course, ultimately Germany will fall behind as countries such as China and India will dominate based on their sheer population, but Germany is still likely to be the largest economy in Europe until Russia catches up to it--which won't happen until several decades after Russia abandons the Communist economic model.

BTW, a side effect of the lack of German invasion of Poland is that there is likewise no Soviet invasion of Poland. This has huge consequences in the long(er)-run since even if the Soviet Union still eventually breaks-up, Russia would have a much easier time putting a lot of the Soviet Union back together if the ultra-nationalistic Galicia and Volhynia were a part of Poland rather than a part of Ukraine.
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,450
Iowa USA
#5
I thought that the Nazis were happy with the size of their population and wanted more Lebensraum so that their population could grow even further?

Maybe I meant to say, rather, that the Nazis' perception of timing to begin the war for such Lebenstraum was dictated by the population. Indeed the policies of the regime encouraged a high brithrate!
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,571
SoCal
#6
Maybe I meant to say, rather, that the Nazis' perception of timing to begin the war for such Lebenstraum was dictated by the population. Indeed the policies of the regime encouraged a high brithrate!
The interesting thing, though, is that there was still plenty of space within Germany to settle all of their excess population. Indeed, eastern Germany had relatively few people during this time (with the possible exception of Silesia).

Also, it's quite interesting that Germany was able to do just fine in spite of it losing a lot of Lebensraum in 1945.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
15,571
SoCal
#7
BTW, the Nazi idea of having Germany expand all of the way to the Urals really was a fringe idea in Germany before the Nazis came to power, correct? I mean, most Germans didn't even want their Brest-Litovsk conquests to be restored, correct?
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,005
#8
BTW, a side effect of the lack of German invasion of Poland is that there is likewise no Soviet invasion of Poland. This has huge consequences in the long(er)-run since even if the Soviet Union still eventually breaks-up, Russia would have a much easier time putting a lot of the Soviet Union back together if the ultra-nationalistic Galicia and Volhynia were a part of Poland rather than a part of Ukraine.
So you still don't think Ukraine is really real then?
 

redcoat

Ad Honorem
Nov 2010
7,604
Stockport Cheshire UK
#10
The interesting thing, though, is that there was still plenty of space within Germany to settle all of their excess population. Indeed, eastern Germany had relatively few people during this time (with the possible exception of Silesia).

Also, it's quite interesting that Germany was able to do just fine in spite of it losing a lot of Lebensraum in 1945.
The war was fought over resources, not land.
Hitler wanted a Germany that was completely self sufficient in all vital resources. Therefore Germany needed to conquer territory that was fertile enough to feed Germany's population, and land that could supply it's oil requirements.
 
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