Was the disappearance of the Neanderthal an extermination?

larkin

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
3,698
#1
I don't usually visit this forum on Historum but the disappearance of this group was a curiosity to me. If often glossed over as a course of nature, a genetic dead end or an inability to survive. Was there an active effort on the part of the Cro magnon to destroy a competitor? There is genetic evidence within our own genes.
 

larkin

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
3,698
#2
More information. please comment,

You know that whenever cannibalism is mentioned they start with the creepy music.
A cave like this one in Northern Spain is an obvious shelter and refuge from enemies. It is easy to see how a group fleeing danger could be driven deeper into the recesses of the cave. It speaks highly of the Neanderthal that they carried fire with them but when the fuel ran out they might find themselves hopelessly lost in pitched black darkness. In this case, cannibalism might be and effort at survival not unknown today.. They have found evidence that Neanderthal families cared for each other and buried a loved one in a grave festooned with flowers. The group lost in a dark cave may have very well been a catastrophe for these individuals.

 

authun

Ad Honorem
Aug 2011
5,181
#3
I don't usually visit this forum on Historum but the disappearance of this group was a curiosity to me. If often glossed over as a course of nature, a genetic dead end or an inability to survive. Was there an active effort on the part of the Cro magnon to destroy a competitor? There is genetic evidence within our own genes.
As far as I understand it, Neaderthals died out because they didn't adapt to a changing situation. They had a system, as far as we can tell, of hunting the animals, whether deer, mamoth, fish in the lake or rivers as they passed through the territory where the hunters lived. Co Magnon on the other hand, travelled to different seasonal hunting grounds. When animal migratory patterns changed as the ice age drew to a close, Neanderthals found themselves short of food whereas Cro Magnon was more used to moving to where their prey was.
 
Jan 2015
3,285
Front Lines of the Pig War
#4
I don't usually visit this forum on Historum but the disappearance of this group was a curiosity to me. If often glossed over as a course of nature, a genetic dead end or an inability to survive. Was there an active effort on the part of the Cro magnon to destroy a competitor? There is genetic evidence within our own genes.
Maybe?

It's tough to judge conclusively with only a few hundred Neandertal skeletons found, many incomplete
 
Sep 2014
898
Texas
#5
just as disease introduced by the spanish devastated the natve americans, the same could have happened to the neanderthal.
 
Mar 2012
3,474
Redneck Country, AKA Texas
#6
I think it's too difficult to tell. There are simply too few Neanderthal remains to conclude anything, whether it was being wiped out by the early humans or a mass epidemic.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,417
Florania
#7
I think it's too difficult to tell. There are simply too few Neanderthal remains to conclude anything, whether it was being wiped out by the early humans or a mass epidemic.
Why are we carrying Neanderthal genes around except for Sub-Saharan Africans?
 
Mar 2012
3,474
Redneck Country, AKA Texas
#10
Why are we carrying Neanderthal genes around except for Sub-Saharan Africans?
Because early humans must have mated with them, obviously. The indigenous peoples of Central America may be on the brink of extinction, but their genes can be found in most Central Americans.
 

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