Was the treatment of Catholics in Northern Ireland similar to the treatment of the Bantu blacks under Apartheid?

Zip

Jan 2018
630
Comancheria
Your premise (if you have one, it's not clear) may be faulty. My mother is a Catholic who grew up in Armagh and came to America as a young adult after WW II. Going by the stories she tells I don't think Catholics in Northern Ireland were treated as badly as Blacks in South Africa were.
 
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Chlodio

Forum Staff
Aug 2016
4,726
Dispargum
For one thing, they did not occur at the same time. Most British actions in Ireland ended in the 1920s when the Irish Republic got its independence. By the time Apartheid gained the world's attention new sensibilities had arisen that had not existed earlier.

Even before Irish independence, the Irish had at least nominal representation in Parliament. In the Victorian Parliaments there were two Irish factions: the Irish Unionists and the Irish Nationalists in addition to the British Liberal and Conservative Parties.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
For one thing, they did not occur at the same time. Most British actions in Ireland ended in the 1920s when the Irish Republic got its independence. By the time Apartheid gained the world's attention new sensibilities had arisen that had not existed earlier.

Even before Irish independence, the Irish had at least nominal representation in Parliament. In the Victorian Parliaments there were two Irish factions: the Irish Unionists and the Irish Nationalists in addition to the British Liberal and Conservative Parties.
He's specifically talking about Northern Ireland here.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,496
Britain still controls Northern Ireland. OP was about Northern Ireland, not southern Ireland, which has been independent for almost 100 years.

No, it wasn't nothing like blacks in South Africa in Northern Ireland after the partition.

Catholics in Ireland were treated badly in the 18th and 19th centuries. Particularly, Catholics were not allowed in most elite occupations and activities. Many of the upper middle class went to the continent for education. If you were an ambitious Irish Catholic in the 18th century, you generally needed to convert or go to Spanish America. The main reason for this was that Catholics were considered disloyal the the protestant usurpers on the English throne.
 
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Zip

Jan 2018
630
Comancheria
Catholics were treated well.
In Northern Ireland Catholics were not treated well but treated better than Blacks in South Africa. My Grandfather couldn't work in the shipyards or linen mills because he was Catholic. But ironically he was allowed to become a professional soldier (Ist Batt. Royal Irish Fusiliers), go into Belgium in 1914 and take 3 wounds during the course of the Great War. Well, a fella has to make a living.

My mother told many stories of humiliations Catholics suffered from the ruling Protestants and of harassment from police and B Specials. She still gets pissed 75 years after coming to America.

Ulster, eh? Would you be from Donegal, Cavan or Monaghan?
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,069
Navan, Ireland
Why was Britain allowed to get away with it but not South Africa?
The simple answer is that they were not treated anything like ' Coloured' people in South Africa.

Now there was discrimination that can not be denied but it wasn't at the level of Apartheid and any way if you moved out side Northern Ireland to the rest of the UK that pretty much disappeared.

Remember the 'British' did not 'rule' Northern Ireland but rather after the war of Independence Ireland split into the predominantly catholic South that was pretty much independent from Britain and the Protestant North that while it had a large measure of self government was still part of the UK. There was not direct rule from London, Irish Protestants discriminated against Irish Catholics.
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,069
Navan, Ireland
………………………………………………………...

Even before Irish independence, the Irish had at least nominal representation in Parliament. In the Victorian Parliaments there were two Irish factions: the Irish Unionists and the Irish Nationalists in addition to the British Liberal and Conservative Parties.
They had much more than 'nominal' representation, in fact they were over represented when compared to the new huge Industrial cities of Britain and at times the Irish Party had the balance of power.
 
Oct 2012
856
The simple answer is that they were not treated anything like ' Coloured' people in South Africa.

Now there was discrimination that can not be denied but it wasn't at the level of Apartheid and any way if you moved out side Northern Ireland to the rest of the UK that pretty much disappeared.

Remember the 'British' did not 'rule' Northern Ireland but rather after the war of Independence Ireland split into the predominantly catholic South that was pretty much independent from Britain and the Protestant North that while it had a large measure of self government was still part of the UK. There was not direct rule from London, Irish Protestants discriminated against Irish Catholics.
A bit of nitpicking, but the word "coloured" didn`t mean "black" in apartheit context, but a people of mixed race. They had more rights than blacks, but not at the level of white South Africans.
 
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