Was the treatment of Catholics in Northern Ireland similar to the treatment of the Bantu blacks under Apartheid?

Sep 2012
1,093
Tarkington, Texas
One factor I see is the Irish could "pass" for either religion, and they also could immigrate. I am part Irish, mostly from Ulster and some from Munster. My Mother's side is mostly from Ulster and did not like Catholic Irish. My Great Great Grandmother was a Mahoney and she married a Union Army veteran after the ACW. My Father remembered her coming to visit when he was young.

I grew up in Louisiana and married a Cajun Catholic. The only one that gave us a problem was her Parish Priest who told me I would have to convert and raise the kids Catholic. The joke is that twenty years later her younger sister wed for the second time in the biggest Catholic Church in Lake Charles. Her Baptist Preacher helped in the ceremony. She is now on her fifth marriage. My ex married again and our youngest was the Flower Girl at the ceremony. The Bride wore white again! You have to keep a sense of humor...

Pruitt
 

Zip

Jan 2018
470
Comancheria
I have Catholic kinsmen in Armagh and Down who are quite content to be part of the UK given they have their political and social rights.

Keep in mind that as a narrowback Irish-American I claim no special knowledge of the current situation of any part of Ireland. I have impressions and careful opinions, that's all. One impression I'm under is that Irish-Americans are more anti British than the Irish themselves. Especially when they're half lit up in the corner tavern.

An interesting tid-bit of history is that during WW II in the British military there were more volunteers from the Free State than men from Northern Ireland. While the Royal Irish Fusiliers were under heavy shellfire in Italy one such soldier was heard to exclaim "I'll say one thing for Dev, he kept us out of this f*#&ing war!".
 
Sep 2013
1,454
Ulster
Catholics were treated fairly well in Ulster. In some cases they were better off than Protestants. Catholics were living in newly built houses ( Unionist Government and the Housing Trust ) while Protestants were living in hovels. This is fact.
 
Sep 2012
1,633
London, centre of my world
In answer to the OP, no.
However.... NI Catholics were discriminated against by NI Unionists, not by the UK government.
 
Sep 2012
1,633
London, centre of my world
Catholics were treated fairly well in Ulster. In some cases they were better off than Protestants. Catholics were living in newly built houses ( Unionist Government and the Housing Trust ) while Protestants were living in hovels. This is fact.
Was this around the time of the Civil Rights Movement in the late 1960's?