Was the treatment of Catholics in Northern Ireland similar to the treatment of the Bantu blacks under Apartheid?

Sep 2012
1,633
London, centre of my world
That's a generalization could you be more specific
The Protestant/Unionist violence against the Catholic communities in the late 1960's (a backlash to O'Neill's policies and the Civil rights Movement) prompted the UK government to send in the army to protect the Catholics against this violence and to restore order. The Stormont government had clearly lost control and the RUC could not cope with the levels of disorder.
It was the start of the Troubles, incidentally.
 
Sep 2012
1,093
Tarkington, Texas
If the Army was sent in to protect the Catholics, what happened when the Paras lost control?

Pruitt
 
Sep 2012
1,633
London, centre of my world
If the Army was sent in to protect the Catholics, what happened when the Paras lost control?

Pruitt
A year into the Troubles, the army had to crack down on the growing influence and actions of the IRA; arms were being hidden in the Falls Road area of Belfast (ostensibly to also protect Catholics) so the soldiers were moved in to remove them. This operation, known as the 'Battle of the Falls' or the 'Falls Curfew' of July 1970 became the turning point as it developed into a full-scale riot and gunfight, with shots being fired from both sides and casualties resulting (the fatal ones were all Catholic).
The IRA benefited greatly from this; the Catholic community no longer trusted the army and many volunteered for the IRA and PIRA and 'the cause' in general.
And so it developed into full-blown conflict.
Then fast-forward to January 1972; Bloody Sunday occurred, which is where the Paras lost control as you say, also helping swell the ranks of the IRA and PIRA in the aftermath.
And it continued on for the next two and a half decades.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
27,000
Italy, Lago Maggiore
I know the region [Ulster in its wider and original meaning ... Donegal + Northern Ireland ...] and It happens I'm there. But being a moderator I'm going to follow the discussion without participating to it.
 
Sep 2013
1,454
Ulster
The Protestant/Unionist violence against the Catholic communities in the late 1960's (a backlash to O'Neill's policies and the Civil rights Movement) prompted the UK government to send in the army to protect the Catholics against this violence and to restore order. The Stormont government had clearly lost control and the RUC could not cope with the levels of disorder.
It was the start of the Troubles, incidentally.
The violence you speak of came firstly from the Catholic population in Londonderry and others like John Hume, Eddie McAteer could not control it. Three days of rioting ensued and the Catholics in Londonderry called on the Catholics of Belfast to come out onto the streets and help take the pressure of them. This they did and a gun attack on the police took place followed the next night by a protest march to a police station where bottles were thrown. On the return march from the police station petrol bombs were thrown into a Protestant car showroom and it was set ablaze. The march then continued to another police station in the lower Falls area where again the same happened.

Streets in the lower Falls ran between there and the Shankill Road. The Catholics then decided to go up these streets and head for the Shankill Rd. As they approached the Shankill Rd they were waving an Irish tricolour flag and they came into sight of Protestant milling about on the Shankil Rd. For the Protestants the attack so often talked about was now happening and so they went towards the advancing Catholics to meet them as they did so they tossed petrol bombs at some houses. Their advance continued and as it did they placed a Union flag on the Falls Rd.

The Protestants were not the initiators of what happened. Catholics started it and getting the worst of it called for the army to be brought in.
 

Zip

Jan 2018
470
Comancheria
It's my observation that often when a group of people giving another group a raw deal can no longer hand out the raw deal they then think they're getting a raw deal.
 
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Sep 2012
1,633
London, centre of my world
The violence you speak of came firstly from the Catholic population in Londonderry and others like John Hume, Eddie McAteer could not control it. Three days of rioting ensued and the Catholics in Londonderry called on the Catholics of Belfast to come out onto the streets and help take the pressure of them. This they did and a gun attack on the police took place followed the next night by a protest march to a police station where bottles were thrown. On the return march from the police station petrol bombs were thrown into a Protestant car showroom and it was set ablaze. The march then continued to another police station in the lower Falls area where again the same happened.

Streets in the lower Falls ran between there and the Shankill Road. The Catholics then decided to go up these streets and head for the Shankill Rd. As they approached the Shankill Rd they were waving an Irish tricolour flag and they came into sight of Protestant milling about on the Shankil Rd. For the Protestants the attack so often talked about was now happening and so they went towards the advancing Catholics to meet them as they did so they tossed petrol bombs at some houses. Their advance continued and as it did they placed a Union flag on the Falls Rd.

The Protestants were not the initiators of what happened. Catholics started it and getting the worst of it called for the army to be brought in.
Are you referring to incidents in the battle of the Bogside?
 

hop

Jun 2012
794
A year into the Troubles, the army had to crack down on the growing influence and actions of the IRA; arms were being hidden in the Falls Road area of Belfast (ostensibly to also protect Catholics) so the soldiers were moved in to remove them. This operation, known as the 'Battle of the Falls' or the 'Falls Curfew' of July 1970 became the turning point as it developed into a full-scale riot and gunfight, with shots being fired from both sides and casualties resulting (the fatal ones were all Catholic).
The IRA benefited greatly from this; the Catholic community no longer trusted the army and many volunteered for the IRA and PIRA and 'the cause' in general.
And so it developed into full-blown conflict.
It was developing into a full blown conflict before that. The first half of 1970 was quiet with only 1 death related to the troubles, a police officer in the Republic killed during a fund raising operation (ie bank robbery). Then on 26 June 3 IRA members and 2 young children were killed in Londonderry when the bomb they were building in one of the IRA member's home exploded prematurely. The following day the IRA shot dead 5 protestants in street disturbances in Belfast, and 2 days after that a Catholic man, shot by the IRA by mistake in the same disturbances, died in hospital.