Was there a war between Russia and Georgia in August 2006?

There was a war?

  • Yes, there was a war.

    Votes: 19 86.4%
  • No, there was no war.

    Votes: 3 13.6%

  • Total voters
    22
Jan 2014
1,793
Portugal
There seems to be some doubts. There are claims that such war never existed.
Is this "mandela effect"?

Thank you.
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
14,293
There is no doubt. There was a war

But there is a typo in the title.. It was August 2008
 
Jul 2010
1,374
N/A
Fine I'll share exactly what I said in the other thread...

To address the problem with knowledge of South Ossetia. I have reiterated this on countless occasions (and mostly to deaf ears). You cannot understand what is going on between Georgia or Russia without understanding the context of South Ossetia. One simply does not come without the other. That is about as clear and matter of fact as I can put it but I will try a little harder to appease you in a different way.

Without South Ossetia there would be no conflict between either Russia or Georgia, in fact for many years, Georgia was one of Russia's strongest partners. This is all a bit ridiculous. Until Georgia declared its interest to join NATO (surprise) Georgia was by and large reliant on Russia for its defense.

As I have explained elsewhere and for sake of brevity... You tell me where the conflict is. I will paint it for you on a map so as it is far more easier for you to join the dots. Yet... you and your friends continue to tell me that there is no issue with NATO and that America is not an agressor in Europe. The funny thing is that it only asked Georgia to join NATO in the first place, and you are even more unaware of the power of diplomacy that I had previously imagined.



I will even spell it out to you more clearly what the conflict is about:

The tensions between Georgia and Russia, which had been heightened even before the collapse of the Soviet Union, climaxed during the secessionist conflict in Abkhazia in 1992–93. Support for the Abkhaz from various groups within Russia such as the Confederation of Mountain Peoples of the Caucasus, Cossacks, and regular military units, and support for South Ossetia by their ethnic brethren who lived in Russia's federal subject of North Ossetia proved critical in the de facto secession of Abkhazia and South Ossetia from Georgia.

In the aftermath of the military setback in Abkhazia in 1993, the Georgian leader Eduard Shevardnadze had to accede to the Kremlin's pressure. In exchange for Russian support against forces loyal to the ousted Georgian president Zviad Gamsakhurdia, he agreed to join the Commonwealth of Independent States and legitimize the Russian military bases in Georgia: Vaziani Military Base, Gudauta, Akhalkalaki and Batumi.

At the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Istanbul Summit of November 1999, agreement was reached that the bases would all be evacuated by Russia before July 1, 2001.

Vaziani was handed over on June 29, 2001. Akhalkalaki was not handed over until June 27, 2007, and Batumi on November 13, 2007. Being in Abkhazia, the base at Gudauta has never been under the control of Georgia.

Russia dominates the collective peacekeeping missions in Abkhazia and South Ossetia but is criticized by Georgia, and, more recently, by several Western diplomats, for failing to maintain neutrality in the conflict zones.

Russia accused Georgia of helping Chechen separatists, and some supplies and reinforcements indeed reached the rebels via Georgian territory. The separatists also took refuge in the Pankisi Gorge in eastern Georgia. After Russia had threatened to launch cross-border attacks against them in 2002, the Georgian government took steps to establish order there with help from the USA.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgia–Russia_relations#Post-independence_relations_(1992–2003)

Now you can lead a horse to water but you can't force it to drink it. As I have kept repeating this is all a bit like what's going on in Chechnya. The conflict is far more protracted than you care to understand, and what is more... Neither side, especially Georgia is innocent of any guilt in this whole situation. The South Ossetians continue to use both the Georgians and the Russians to their own devices.
 
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Jan 2014
1,793
Portugal
Dude you're impressive, you know you're wrong.
No one is saying that the war was not a result of the problems with South Ossetia, but you keep reapiting it and insulting.
Relax man. There was a war, and we know that you know about all the context.
 
Jul 2010
1,374
N/A
I'll go right back to basics since its not even really about proving right or wrong. As I said in the other thread last night I don't really care. A good debate really doesn't have a right or wrong, we should move beyond that faulty concept.

  • One side calls it an intervention, it just so happens because one side of a community is blockaded on the wrong side of a national border (this is what happens where we draw artificial boundaries on a map, they don't tend to represent reality).
  • The other side calls it a war because they have some sort of anti-Russian agenda at the time, all of the above is explained on the basis of the above.

There is no right or wrong in this case particularly until you apply the construct of media bias (and this forum just so happens to be in the west so its self reflective of media bias). Both sides screwed up royally. As we are finding out also in Crimea this is what happens when you put artificial lines on a map.

It happens in Africa and the Middle East, it happens in Europe and Asia, even Australia also. Now maybe the problem here is actually the fact that we have states in the first place and not with whether a "war" did or did not happen in "Georgia."
 
Jan 2014
1,793
Portugal
I'll go right back to basics since its not even really about proving right or wrong. As I said in the other thread last night I don't really care. A good debate really doesn't have a right or wrong, we should move beyond that faulty concept.

  • One side calls it an intervention, it just so happens because one side of a community is blockaded on the wrong side of a national border (this is what happens where we draw artificial boundaries on a map, they don't tend to represent reality).
  • The other side calls it a war because they have some sort of anti-Russian agenda at the time, all of the above is explained on the basis of the above.

There is no right or wrong in this case particularly until you apply the construct of media bias (and this forum just so happens to be in the west so its self reflective of media bias). Both sides screwed up royally. As we are finding out also in Crimea this is what happens when you put artificial lines on a map.

It happens in Africa and the Middle East, it happens in Europe and Asia, even Australia also. Now maybe the problem here is actually the fact that we have states in the first place and not with whether a "war" did or did not happen in "Georgia."
There's no anti Russia agenda in my case.
Russian oficials, PM, DM, etc. Recognize Russian defense force units invasion of Georgia.
As you can see 80% of the voters till now recognize the fact.

I understand the fact that you are putting in question if there are "states" on the two sides, cause if there aren't there is no "war".
But the fact is:
- Russian armed forces (representatives of russian state) engaged in armed combat with Georgian armed forces (representativea of georgian state).
By legal definitions: there was a war.
 
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Jul 2010
1,374
N/A
Well then you obviously have a narrow mind about the matter and I can't really help you any further. Was there a US intervention in Iraq categorically yes, was there an intervention to smooth the pillow of the dying race in Australia in relation to indigenous communities, history also tells us yes.

I have spent some time explaining the complex case of Georgia and Russia. I will reiterate the point again and maybe this time you will understand it. Neither party on either side of this matter is innocent of the facts.

In the aftermath of the military setback in Abkhazia in 1993, the Georgian leader Eduard Shevardnadze had to accede to the Kremlin's pressure. In exchange for Russian support against forces loyal to the ousted Georgian president Zviad Gamsakhurdia, he agreed to join the Commonwealth of Independent States and legitimize the Russian military bases in Georgia: Vaziani Military Base, Gudauta, Akhalkalaki and Batumi.
The Georgians went into a conflict with the ethnic people of Abkhazia and lost. To which the South Ossetians and Abkhazians used the Georgian armed forces to their own devices.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_Civil_War

In response the Russians intervened to save Georgia face with some kick backs happening as a result.

In 2008 it happened again, Russia intervened in the matter to try to stop the conflict and the Western media had a field day with it as per usual. You really need to stop believing everything you hear.
 
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