Was there any US general who suggest offensive attack into north vietnam territory

Edratman

Forum Staff
Feb 2009
6,847
Eastern PA
Surely a war plans were elaborated. Are they available to the public? Or maybe is too soon.
In 1966 the MaNamara plan was search and destroy missions accompanied by overwhelming air and artillery combined with extensive bombing campaign in N. Vietnam. Nixon acknowledged the public pressure and started Vietnamization, that is American withdrawal combined with shifting of the combat burden to S. Vietnamese forces.

McNamara's plan was an unvoiced statement that the S. Vietnamese government was a corrupt, ineffective minority entity, comprised mainly of holdovers from French colonial era who had regard for the Buddhist peasant majority population which meant that the national government only controlled about 25% of the country, in both land and population. A vital point from that split meant that the American military was nor viewed as allies when they were in most of the countryside, rather they were looked upon as foreign invaders. The impact of that was huge. Most of the mistakes committed by the American military stemmed from that fact, both in operational issues and planning. Therefore, the much maligned body count plan was pretty much the sole viable option, the old "Bleed 'em dry" option. After the Hanoi government demonstrated that they were willing and able to keep their nation convinced to absorb the horrific casualties, there really wasn't another option available to the Americans, but the ensuing withdrawal was significantly delayed by a reluctance to be the people in charge at the time of defeat.

It wasn't until the last 20 years that I realized exactly how much the government and press failed to inform us exactly how unreliable the S. Vietnamese government really was and exactly how little of S. Vietnam considered themselves part of the nation. It should have been obvious with all the TV coverage that much of S. Vietnam was actually "Indian Country", but those who should have been responsible for pointing out that simple analysis let us down. And most of us really did not discern that on our own.
 

Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,765
Portugal
In 1966 the MaNamara plan was search and destroy missions accompanied by overwhelming air and artillery combined with extensive bombing campaign in N. Vietnam. Nixon acknowledged the public pressure and started Vietnamization, that is American withdrawal combined with shifting of the combat burden to S. Vietnamese forces.

McNamara's plan was an unvoiced statement that the S. Vietnamese government was a corrupt, ineffective minority entity, comprised mainly of holdovers from French colonial era who had regard for the Buddhist peasant majority population which meant that the national government only controlled about 25% of the country, in both land and population. A vital point from that split meant that the American military was nor viewed as allies when they were in most of the countryside, rather they were looked upon as foreign invaders. The impact of that was huge. Most of the mistakes committed by the American military stemmed from that fact, both in operational issues and planning. Therefore, the much maligned body count plan was pretty much the sole viable option, the old "Bleed 'em dry" option. After the Hanoi government demonstrated that they were willing and able to keep their nation convinced to absorb the horrific casualties, there really wasn't another option available to the Americans, but the ensuing withdrawal was significantly delayed by a reluctance to be the people in charge at the time of defeat.

It wasn't until the last 20 years that I realized exactly how much the government and press failed to inform us exactly how unreliable the S. Vietnamese government really was and exactly how little of S. Vietnam considered themselves part of the nation. It should have been obvious with all the TV coverage that much of S. Vietnam was actually "Indian Country", but those who should have been responsible for pointing out that simple analysis let us down. And most of us really did not discern that on our own.
I noted that my question was ambiguous, I was asking about the War plans to invade the North, made either by some staff, or by some military academy (for instance Spain’s war plans to invade Portugal in 1940 were revealed only in 1975).

A bit off topic one of my first contacts with the Vietnam War was with an outstanding Canadian TV Series documentary of 26 episodes with extensive use of footage with a voice off. I am not much a fan of documentaries, but this is old style, a good job, that really is worth to see for those who are interested in the theme, that analgises all the phases of the war, including the “search and destroy” and the later “vietnamization”:

The Ten Thousand Day War (TV Mini-Series 1980– ) - IMDb

Vietnam: The Ten Thousand Day War - Wikipedia

The series passed in Portugal in RTP2, in the early 80’s, when at the time there were only 2 TV channels. Even my father saw some episodes with me. He was a Portuguese Colonial War veteran, and the wars had almost the same timeline, and had (some) similarities. Recently I got the series from Youtube in 13 episodes, but the quality seems lower, then the one of 26 episodes:

VIETNAM: THE 10,000 DAY WAR - CBC - COMPLETE SERIES - YouTube

EDIT:

By the way, the US Army is probably the army in the world that has the biggest massive online presence that helps much the ones interested in military history.

This site is still building up, but in the resources we already have plenty of material available.

Welcome to The Vietnam Era - U.S. Army Center of Military History

Where we can find: https://history.army.mil/html/books/090/90-8-1/CMH_Pub_90-8-1.pdf

And while looking for the US plans to invade the North, I begun to read this:

https://www.jcs.mil/Portals/36/Documents/History/Vietnam/Vietnam_1969-1970.pdf
 
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Edratman

Forum Staff
Feb 2009
6,847
Eastern PA
I noted that my question was ambiguous, I was asking about the War plans to invade the North, made either by some staff, or by some military academy (for instance Spain’s war plans to invade Portugal in 1940 were revealed only in 1975).
I am unaware of any contemporaneous war plans to invade N. Vietnam. On the other hand, I have learned that the Pentagon is hugely invested in producing war plans for every conceivable situation, so it would not be surprising to find out that a plan was produced.