Was there ever a king of Breton descent in France?

Sep 2016
1,271
Georgia
Alice married into the Burgundy dynasty, Eleanor into the Flanders dynasty. I would be surprised if one of their descendants didn't turn up in the French royal line somewhere.
I mean, there is obviously a very high possibility of that. Similar to that, Louis XIV was also Italian and had blood of Visconti in him. He was the descendant of powerful Duke of Milan Gian Galeazzo Visconti.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
21,827
SoCal
What the title says. Any king who comes from Brittany, or at least has some Breton descent, counts.
Had the Dukes of Brittany male line survived after 1488 and eventually become the senior-most legitimate agnatic Capetian line (this would require the Bourbon-Vendome male lines to completely die out), then they would have in all likelihood inherited the French throne. Would that have counted for this?
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,939
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
Louis VII of France was descended from Alice.
According to the genealogics website Louis VII of France married a descendant of William the Conqueror.

Duke Richard II of Normandy (d. 1026) married Judith of Rennes (982-1017), daughter of Duke Conan I of Brittany (d. 992).

Their son Robert I (d. 1035) was the father of:

William I the Conqueror, King of England (c. 1028-1087).

William's daughter Adela (c. 1067-1137) married Count Stephen II of Blois. Adela and Stephen were the parents of several sons including King Stephan of England and:

Theobald II, Count of Champagne (1090-1152). He was the father of several children including:

Adela of Champagne (c.1140-1206) who married King Louis VII of France (1120-1180). They had two children, including Agnes of France (1171-after 1204), widow of two violently killed emperors before she was 15, and:

King Philip II Augustus of France (1165-1223) who was the male line ancestor of all later kings of France including all of the direct Capetians, all the Valois, all the Bourbons, etc., etc.

https://www.genealogics.org/pedigree.php?personID=I00000170&tree=LEO&parentset=0&display=standard&generations=7

According to Genealogics, King Louis VII of France (1120-1180) was also descended from Duke Richard II of Normandy (d. 1026) and Judith of Rennes (982-1017), daughter of Duke Conan I of Brittany (d. 992), but not through William the Conquer.

Duke Richard II of Normandy (d. 1026) and Judith of Rennes (982-1017) had a daughter:

Adelais of Normandy (d. after 1037) who married Count Renaud I of Burgundy (c. 986-1057). Their children included:

William I Count of Burgundy (c.1018?-1087) whose children included:

Gisela of burgundy (d. after 1133) who married Umberto II, Count of Savoy (1070-1103). Their children included:

Adele of Savoy (c. 1092 - 1154) who married King Louis VI of France (1081-1137). Their children included:

King Louis VII of France (1120-1180).

https://www.genealogics.org/pedigree.php?personID=I00000211&tree=LEO&parentset=0&display=standard&generations=6

As far as I can tell, King Louis VII of France (1120-1180) was the first Capetian king of France to have any known Breton ancestors. As far as I can tell King Louis V, the last Carolingian King of France, had no known Breton ancestors. As far as I can tell no Merovingian king of the Franks had any Breton ancestors. It seems probable that King Henry II of France, who was one quarter Breton through his mother's mother, was probably the French king with the largest proportion of Breton ancestry.

King Francis I of France (1494-1547) was descended from Duke John IV of Brittany (1339-1399).

Duke John IV of Brittany (1339-1399) was the father of:

Margaret of Brittany (13924-1428) who married Alain IX, Viscount of Rohan who himself counts as a Breton.

There children include Margueritte of Rohan, who should count as a Breton herself, who married John, Count of Angouleme (1399-1467). their children include:

Charles, Count of Angouleme (1459-1496) whose children include:

King Francis I of France (1494-1547) who was thus one quarter Breton.

And it is possible that other earlier kings were also as much as a quarter Breton.
 
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