Weird question but what is your favorite act of Congress?

Nov 2018
34
St. Louis, MO
#1
"Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the tract of land in the Territories of Montana and Wyoming, lying near the headwaters of the Yellowstone River, and described as follows, to wit, commencing at the junction of Gardiner's river with the Yellowstone river, and running east to the meridian passing ten miles to the eastward of the most eastern point of Yellowstone lake; thence south along said meridian to the parallel of latitude passing ten miles south of the most southern point of Yellowstone lake; thence west along said parallel to the meridian passing fifteen miles west of the most western point of Madison lake; thence north along said meridian to the latitude of the junction of Yellowstone and Gardiner's rivers; thence east to the place of beginning, is hereby reserved and withdrawn from settlement, occupancy, or sale under the laws of the United States, and dedicated and set apart as a public park or pleasuring-ground for the benefit and enjoyment of the people" - The Yellowstone Act of 1872, signed into law by Ulysees S. Grant.

Sent from my PH-1 using Tapatalk
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
13,495
SoCal
#4
Go ahead!

Sent from my PH-1 using Tapatalk
Well, the Louisiana Purchase Treaty appears to be a favorite of mine. After all, it allowed the U.S. to significant expand--securing additional living space for the U.S. as well as additional farmland and natural resources for the U.S. It also paved the way for further expansion of the U.S. in the future; after all, without Louisiana, the U.S. wouldn't have bordered either Oregon or what is now the Southwestern U.S. and thus would have been unable to expand there.
 
Nov 2018
34
St. Louis, MO
#6
Well, the Louisiana Purchase Treaty appears to be a favorite of mine. After all, it allowed the U.S. to significant expand--securing additional living space for the U.S. as well as additional farmland and natural resources for the U.S. It also paved the way for further expansion of the U.S. in the future; after all, without Louisiana, the U.S. wouldn't have bordered either Oregon or what is now the Southwestern U.S. and thus would have been unable to expand there.
Seeing as I'm from St. Louis, the Louisiana Purchase should have quite a bit of significance to me I reckon.

Sent from my PH-1 using Tapatalk
 
Likes: Futurist

Similar History Discussions