Welsh History

Feb 2008
275
Cincinnati
#21
Damn, Australia to London must be one heck of a long flight. The longest I've even been on a plane was 3-4 hours (Indianapolis to Las Vegas), and that was quite long enough :)

That sounds like a cool job though, best of luck with your interview! Hope you realize you'll have to put up with loads of American tourists, I've heard we're terrible overseas :rolleyes:
 
#22
Why not finish them as a nation?, the Welsh had always caused English Kings trouble through the years so he took the final step of crushing them after Llywelyn repeatedly refused to pay homage to King Edward, and so he launched the first campaign against Llywelyn.

Llywelyn was lucky though, as he was allowed to keep the title of "Prince of Wales". After that the title passed to the English monarchy as a sign of power, overlordship etc, its just the way of things.
Well, that was (among other things) the reason for the invasion in 1277.

The final invasion and conquest of Gwynedd (1282) was because Llywelyn's rather troublesome brother Dafydd stirred up a rebellion and attacked (among other places) Hawarden castle.

I wrote an essay on this back as a first year undergraduate, I will have to dig it up.

Edit: I've found the essay (and I think it may actually be the first (and worst) one I ever wrote as an undergrad), but if anyones interested, I seemed to use four books more than all the others, they are: -

Beverly Smith, J., Llywelyn ap Gruffudd: Prince of Wales, (Cardiff, 1998).
Carr, A. D., Llywelyn ap Gruffydd, (Cardiff, 1982).
Gregory, D., Wales Before 1536 - A Guide, (Llanrwst, 1993).
Griffiths, R., (ed.), 1282: A Collection of Documents, (Aberystwyth, 1986).
 
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Feb 2008
275
Cincinnati
#23
Welcome to the site Invader Zim :)

I have read the first book on your list, the Beverly Smith bio of Llywelyn. I'm curious to find out how difficult (or easy) it was for you to find this book in the UK; I assume you found it in your university library? I read it while still in college; my university belongs to a state-wide library consortium consisting of 86 universities and the State Library of Ohio, and only 3 of those libraries have a copy. I imagine it's more available in the UK?
 
#24
Yeah, its in my university library. I don't know how available it is in other parts of the UK but as I go to university in Wales the library is very well stocked in terms of Welsh history.

Additionally in the UK (I'm not sure if it is the case in the States) we have legal deposit libraries which, by law, automatically gains a copy of every book published in Britain since the library was built. As a result at least three libraries, plus a number of other libraries (probably university libraries) will contain copies.
 
Feb 2008
275
Cincinnati
#25
Yeah, its in my university library. I don't know how available it is in other parts of the UK but as I go to university in Wales the library is very well stocked in terms of Welsh history.

Additionally in the UK (I'm not sure if it is the case in the States) we have legal deposit libraries which, by law, automatically gains a copy of every book published in Britain since the library was built. As a result at least three libraries, plus a number of other libraries (probably university libraries) will contain copies.
I believe that the Library of Congress contains a copy of every book published here in the States, but it's unique in that regard as far as I know.
 

Chookie

Ad Honorem
Nov 2007
7,628
Alba
#26
I believe that the Library of Congress contains a copy of every book published here in the States, but it's unique in that regard as far as I know.
It's hardly unique as the British Library in London, The National Library of Scotland and the Welsh and Northern Irish equivalents and probably their equivalents in the rest of Europe have the same requirements.
 

Black Dog

Ad Honorem
Mar 2008
9,990
Damned England
#27
Edward I was what the barons etc expected of a king: he liked war, he'd spent most of his life fighting. Yes, the kind of megalomania usual in kings infected him- but let's not forget some pretty important facts:

Edward was asked to arbitrate in the Bruce/Balliol dispute for the Scottish throne. It was quite normal to ask another monarch to arbitrate and even pass judgement. From what we know, it seems that this was a dispute which couldn't have an outcome that everyone liked,: opinion in Scotland was so polarised. It was plain that when Edward I judged that Balliol should be king, he'd have to lend military aid to enforce his judgement and to prop up Balliol. Edward was not the kind of man to endure opposition, and he was, by rights, Balliol's overlord, as Scottish kings had been for a long time. When what was essentially a civil war broke out, he had little option.

However, both Wales and Scotland had one pretty serious threat which made their invasion by England inevitable, sooner or later: the fact that they could be used as a beachhead by a more powerful invading army, such as the French. Indeed, most Scottish insurrections after the conquest of Scotland and many Welsh and indeed Irish revolts were either paid for by France, or they also got military support- the "Auld Alliance", as it was styled in Scotland. This wasn't because of any love for the Celtic peoples on behalf of France, just a realisation that they had their uses and were better situated for military action. Owain Glyndwr was promised French support in several battles in South Wales; and it was often said that "England's weakness is Scotland's opportunity", as exemplified by Edward II.

Sometimes, though, History is made by quirks of personality, such as Edward's bellicose nature, and his desire to codify and tidy things up once and for all, for let us not forget that Edward was not just a conquerer and warrior, he also codified English law. Militarily, neither Wales nor Scotland were such a terrible threat, and this is exemplified by Edward's castles in Wales- such a huge expense merely to subdue a population which probably only numbered in hundreds of thousands. Llewelyn Ap Gruffydd almost pushed his subjects too far, attempting to raise taxes to arm his small army to the same standard as the English, whilst Glyndwr's only crime, initially, was that he was stitched up by his neighbour. Until then, he was, to all intents and purposes, a Knight in the service of the English king. Most of this can be put down to Angevin bad temper!
 
Feb 2008
275
Cincinnati
#28
It's hardly unique as the British Library in London, The National Library of Scotland and the Welsh and Northern Irish equivalents and probably their equivalents in the rest of Europe have the same requirements.
Hey Chookie,

I just meant it is the only such library in the United States. From what Invader Zim said, there are several libraries in Wales that obtain a copy of every book published there, but as far as I know the Library of Congress is the only US library that does the same.
 
#29
Hey Chookie,

I just meant it is the only such library in the United States. From what Invader Zim said, there are several libraries in Wales that obtain a copy of every book published there, but as far as I know the Library of Congress is the only US library that does the same.
To clarify, not libraries in Wales. Wales has only one deposit library, the National Library of Wales, there are however five other deposit libraries in the United Kingdom.
 

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