Were any British colonies more popular with the Scottish than the English?

Jun 2013
6,342
USA
#1
Were there any British colonies that particularly were more popular with Scottish settlers than English ones? Or at least ones where there was a much higher Scottish population than usual? Or were colonies more integrated when it came to British settlers?
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
5,768
#4
Scots were more comfortable than English with the climate in Canada.

Scotland had its own colony in Panama when they had different parliaments but the same king. It didn't work out and a few people were executed over it. The Spanish renamed the Church of Scotland churches in honor of saints.

There was a large Scotch Irish and Scotch immigration to Pennsylvania in colonial times and most went west and some moved south into the southern Appalachians. The Quakers proprietors of Pennsylvania allowed in Scotish and German protestants. In Virginia, you had to be Church of England and in New England you pretty much had to be Congregationalists.
 
Jan 2014
2,292
Westmorland
#5
Scots were more comfortable than English with the climate in Canada.
Really? The climate in the upland half of England is not noticeably different to that of most of upland Scotland* and bits of Scotland benefit from relatively good weather. Tiree is noted for the number of days' sun it gets per annum (notwithstanding that there is usually a Force 10 blowing) and they can (and do) grow palm trees in places like Poolewe.

Or were colonies more integrated when it came to British settlers?
There may have been areas that were more popular than others for different groups of settlers, but we need to bear in mind that Scotland was (and still is) a full participant in Britain and notwithstanding the silly Anglophobia in certain quarters, Scots and English people have been extremely well integrated for centuries. It's usually only people outside Britain who like to think we are still enemies, usually pursuant to some dumbass Braveheart-esque narrative in which the Scots are the tough freedom-loving good guys and the English are the high-handed, callous wimps.

*As the saying goes round here - "don't like the weather? Don't worry - there'll be some more along in a bit".
 
Last edited:

Edratman

Ad Honorem
Feb 2009
6,177
Eastern PA
#6
Language undoubtedly was responsible for lesser concentration of Scottish immigrants. The immigrants from non-English nations concentrated for a host of sensible reasons: if you have only a single language, it is hard to survive if you are the only Polish (eg) speaker for 100 miles, there is comfort and security with other's of similar background, in large groups there are certainly those that will be bi-lingual and life is greatly facilitated by having someone available who can communicate with the authorities.........

Most Scots could speak English, facilitating dispersal across the land, the same as immigrants from England.
 

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,628
Europe
#7
The West Indies, especially Jamaica?
There seems to have been quite a few slave plantations there with Scottish sounding names, or Scottish slave owners.
 

Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,243
South of the barcodes
#8
A good portion of those names will have been covenanters and Royalists exported during the comonwealth. Once their indentured service was finished it either wasnt worth returning, they preferred a new start or they just couldnt afford to passage.

Montserat has a large number of Irish landholders for exactly the same reason.
 

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,628
Europe
#9
A good portion of those names will have been covenanters and Royalists exported during the comonwealth. Once their indentured service was finished it either wasnt worth returning, they preferred a new start or they just couldnt afford to passage.

Montserat has a large number of Irish landholders for exactly the same reason.

No. They (both Scottish and Irish) are not that far back. They are tracable in the compensation registers, when slavery in the West Indies was abolished (1833). There is a good website with a list of most who were compensated

Search | Legacies of British Slave-ownership
 
#10
Gaelic-speaking Scots enclaves were probably more prevalent in the Maritime provinces of Canada than in any other British colony. I don't think that Gaelic ever caught on in the U.S.A., Australia, New Zealand, or elsewhere.