Were any Communist parties outside of Europe supporters of ethnic federalization?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
In the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia (and, to some extent, in Yugoslavia as well), Communists federalized their countries along ethnic lines. In turn, this helped facilitate the break-up of these countries once Communist rule there collapsed--with the Soviet Union becoming fifteen separate, independent countries, with Czechoslovakia becoming two separate, independent countries, and with Yugoslavia becoming seven separate, independent countries.

However, what I am curious about is this--were there any other countries (including countries where Communists never actually managed to come to power) where Communists also advocated ethnic federalization?

Basically, I am curious as to whether there was the potential for any other countries to eventually break-up along ethnic lines if/after Communists took over these countries.

Anyway, any thoughts on this?
 
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Nov 2015
991
Mountains of madness
In yugoslavia communists before war even were not short supporting of desintegration of country thoguh this was in years they were repressed.it woudl be replaced with balkan federation.ehtnic lines and balance were very important issue always though and thats what lead to demise of country at end.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/4th_Congress_of_the_Communist_Party_of_Yugoslavia

article is one sided and poor in info but it give you basics
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
Very interesting; thanks! I wonder why the Yugoslav Communists changed their mind about breaking up the country after they actually gained power in Yugoslavia. Could it be because power corrupts?

I wonder if @Maki, @Kotromanic, @Highlander, @Offspring, and/or @Visigoth Panzer have anything to say about this as well as about my OP here in general.
 
Aug 2017
15
Cape Town
The most blatant example would be the triangle of Poland/Ukraine/Byelorus. After WW2, Poland was basically shifted a few hundred kilometres westwards and millions of people were forcibly resettled ( not counting the Germans fleeing the Red Army ). Poles to the new Poland, Ukrainians to within the new borders of the Ukraine and Byelorussians to new Byelarus. For all their talk about the international worker class bla bla the Sowjets were concerned a lot with ethnicity.

I guees you could consider that sort of a confederation.
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,038
Iowa USA
@Futurist did you just elevate the status of Kosovo to "independent"? :oops:

I'll re-read this thread in a few hours and try to make a more meaningful comment. Since I've joined the forum I've learned so much about former Yugoslavia and the outline of the history of all Southern Europe. Still feel like aside from a few narrow time periods that I'm the learner rather than the resource.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
@Futurist did you just elevate the status of Kosovo to "independent"? :oops:
The Kosovars themselves did that 11 years ago.

I'll re-read this thread in a few hours and try to make a more meaningful comment. Since I've joined the forum I've learned so much about former Yugoslavia and the outline of the history of all Southern Europe. Still feel like aside from a few narrow time periods that I'm the learner rather than the resource.
How much did you previously learn about Yugoslavia from your own family and relatives?
 

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
5,038
Iowa USA
How much did you previously learn about Yugoslavia from your own family and relatives?
Like most of the early immigrants from that region to the US the first four of our family were subjects of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. The impression which I always had was that they were possibly content to be part of Austria rather than part of lands of the Petrovic princes of Montenegro. From the grandmother's side there were fewer impressions of the Old World since the they had immigrated 30 to 35 years earlier than my on grandfather's side.

I don't have the same high level of interest in the medieval centuries as many among the Serbian diaspora. This forum has been lucky to have several contributors that have thought critically about sources from that those centuries.

I would say that when I began reading the forum in 2010 and 2011 I was barely aware of how the Karageorgeviches regained the monarchy in the early 20th century. That is, I was ignorant of the violent coup d'etat of 1904. I couldn't name any of the military commanders of 1912-1918 either. The centennial of World War I was upcoming during a period that I worked on a long-term assignment away from home which was the beginning of my study on the World War I and the inspiration to begin my small library of sources on the war.
 
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Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,793
Republika Srpska
Very interesting; thanks! I wonder why the Yugoslav Communists changed their mind about breaking up the country after they actually gained power in Yugoslavia. Could it be because power corrupts?
In order to answer that question, we need to consider how the early Communists in Yugoslavia looked at the country. For them, Yugoslavia, then a kingdom, was nothing more than a different name for Greater Serbia. A country in which the Serbs were the only decision-makers and other nations were oppressed. So, obviously, such a state had to be dissolved. The Communists even supported the Ustaše during their rebellion in 1932, although they did criticize their Fascist character. Over the time, however, the ideology of "Brotherhood and Unity" became the accepted dogma of the CPY. They now wanted to reform Yugoslavia and transform it from Greater Serbia to a union of equal nations and republics.

BTW, @Futurist, if you are going to add the "Republic of Kosovo" to the list of independent states, add Abkhazia and South Ossetia. So the USSR dissolved into 17 independent states.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,750
SoCal
In order to answer that question, we need to consider how the early Communists in Yugoslavia looked at the country. For them, Yugoslavia, then a kingdom, was nothing more than a different name for Greater Serbia. A country in which the Serbs were the only decision-makers and other nations were oppressed. So, obviously, such a state had to be dissolved. The Communists even supported the Ustaše during their rebellion in 1932, although they did criticize their Fascist character. Over the time, however, the ideology of "Brotherhood and Unity" became the accepted dogma of the CPY. They now wanted to reform Yugoslavia and transform it from Greater Serbia to a union of equal nations and republics.
Makes sense.

BTW, @Futurist, if you are going to add the "Republic of Kosovo" to the list of independent states, add Abkhazia and South Ossetia. So the USSR dissolved into 17 independent states.
Why not also Transnistria and the Donbass, then? So, instead of 15 or 17, the USSR would break up into 19 independent countries--or is it 20 since the Donbass could be viewed as two separate independent countries?