Were Christians capable of colonizing parts of the Muslim world to the extent that Jews colonized Palestine?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Were Christians capable of colonizing parts of the Muslim world to the extent that Jews colonized Palestine? Right now, there are slightly over 6.5 million Jews in historical Palestine--with this number continuing to rapidly grow. Could a comparable or, better yet, even greater number of Christians (specifically White European Christians) have settled in some parts of the Muslim world? If so, which parts of the Muslim world and what exactly would it have realistically taken to result in such extremely massive Christian settler colonialism in the Muslim world?

For the record, the French colonization of Algeria is of a scale several times smaller than I would like for the purposes of this question. At their peak, there were less than 1.5 million pieds-noirs in Algeria (and even then, the Algerian Jews would have to be subtracted from this calculation since they weren't recent colonizers); in contrast, I want European settlement in the Muslim world to be at least five times greater than that in scale.

Any thoughts on how to accomplish this?
 
Apr 2017
1,655
U.S.A.
The crusades were pretty much this in practice.
The Jews wanted a jewish state (and a small one), while the Europeans wanted territory, resources and money; as colonialism was based around profit and glory.
If you mean during the colonial period, then they would have to resort to ethnic cleansing/genocide or focus on a few small regions. Say if France only colonized Algeria and nothing else.
Generally this amount of immigration wasn't done because they didn't need to. In the new world (at least in the English speaking parts) they had to bring in people to do everything, so lots of settlers. While in the muslim regions they already had people there to do stuff, the Europeans just came there to rule them.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
So, you think that even a scenario where the Crusader states survive isn't going to result in large scale White European immigration to the Crusader states?
 
Apr 2017
1,655
U.S.A.
So, you think that even a scenario where the Crusader states survive isn't going to result in large scale White European immigration to the Crusader states?
I meant in the colonization era.
If the Crusader states survived somehow they may have been drawn into the European orbit (if they didn't go native) and yes, had much European immigration. This could be comparable to the greek settlements in asia. They never really settled in such large numbers to displace the local population (aside from asia minor under the byzantines but this was more assimilation).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
I meant in the colonization era.
OK. For the record, though, my own question applied both to the colonization era and to the period in time before that.

If the Crusader states survived somehow they may have been drawn into the European orbit (if they didn't go native)
Native in what sense?

and yes, had much European immigration. This could be comparable to the greek settlements in asia. They never really settled in such large numbers to displace the local population (aside from asia minor under the byzantines but this was more assimilation).
There weren't that many Greeks in Asia, were there? I mean, a couple of million at the very most, no?
 
Apr 2017
1,655
U.S.A.
OK. For the record, though, my own question applied both to the colonization era and to the period in time before that.

Native in what sense?

There weren't that many Greeks in Asia, were there? I mean, a couple of million at the very most, no?
Native in the sense most conquerors do. Their descendants pick up the language and culture of the local inhabitants, eventually becoming indistinguishable.

Greeks in asia were similar to Europeans in their already populated colonies. Anatolia during the height of the byzantine empire was mostly greek-speaking, this was more to assimilation. My point being assimilation would be a greater factor in colonization for this than immigration. Israel is a special case.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Futurist
Mar 2016
1,222
Australia
So, you think that even a scenario where the Crusader states survive isn't going to result in large scale White European immigration to the Crusader states?
No, this almost certainly would not have happened. Even during the height of Outremer's existence in the mid-12th century immigration was very limited and sporadic, with most people simply being pilgrams and tourists that stayed for a few months or a year at most and then returned home to Europe. The only attraction was the holy sites, mostly in and around Jerusalem. The land wasn't particularly valuable or abundant, it was a completely foreign and alien place, and there was the constant threat of raids and wars with the Muslims. Not exactly the type of place that attracts people wanting to permanently move there. Even when the kings of Jerusalem tried to lower the price on land to attract European settlers it didn't have much effect.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
No, this almost certainly would not have happened. Even during the height of Outremer's existence in the mid-12th century immigration was very limited and sporadic, with most people simply being pilgrams and tourists that stayed for a few months or a year at most and then returned home to Europe. The only attraction was the holy sites, mostly in and around Jerusalem. The land wasn't particularly valuable or abundant, it was a completely foreign and alien place, and there was the constant threat of raids and wars with the Muslims. Not exactly the type of place that attracts people wanting to permanently move there. Even when the kings of Jerusalem tried to lower the price on land to attract European settlers it didn't have much effect.
Very interesting!

Anyway, it's interesting that, in spite of the lack of European settlement, the Crusader states were able to hold out for a couple of centuries--albeit losing Jerusalem after a little less than a century.

Also, what made 19th and early 20th century Algeria more attractive to settle in comparison to the Crusader states?