Were Maryland and Pennsylvania princely states?

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,497
They had hereditary governors who were members of the House of Lords. In British India many of the princes were originally high status, but made royal by the British. The British tended to rule indirectly through local aristocracy and/or parliaments.
 
Oct 2016
1,174
Merryland
proprietary colonies
Pennsylvania to the Penn family
Maryland to the Calverts
the latter eventually gave up on the colony business and transferred to the Crown
 
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betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,497
Maryland to the Calverts
the latter eventually gave up on the colony business and transferred to the Crown
The colony had royal governors for 25 years afters the "Glorious Revolution". The son of the hereditary governor agreed to convert to Church of England and was made governor. Were the Calverts again removed as governors before the American Revolution?
 
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Apr 2010
1,048
evergreen state, USA
It looks pretty solid now that Thomas Greene, the second proprietary governor of colonial Maryland, is a direct ancestor of mine. But the politics and suchlike back there eludes me. What I learned about him I mostly got by googling, ha ha. My maternal great-grandfather was Charles Leonard Green(e), who was just an ordinary citizen, and was in the union army from Indiana at the time of the Civil War. He later ended up in Wisconsin. One of his talents was as a blacksmith, according to a census.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,990
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
They had hereditary governors who were members of the House of Lords. In British India many of the princes were originally high status, but made royal by the British. The British tended to rule indirectly through local aristocracy and/or parliaments.
As I remember no member of the Penn family was ever a peer or a member of the house of lords.

Your statement that:
In British India many of the princes were originally high status, but made royal by the British
seems very vague and imprecise.

The Hindu rulers in India used many different titles and ranks; the lowest ranks were more or less the equivalents of European noble ranks, while the higher ranks were royal and higher. In British India the most important HIndu rulers used titles in the form of "Maharaja of [the name of their state], which translates as great king of that state. However many of them also had a title without any territorial mention of maharajadhiraja meaning great king of kings or maybe king of great kings, a title or rank which seems to have been more personal than territorial. The highest title granted by the Mughal Padishahs to Hindus was maharajadhiraja bahadur which translates roughly as exalted great king of kings.

The titles used by Muslim rulers in India and else where are much harder to categorize. It was very rare for Muslim rulers to use titles like malik or shah that translate into English as king. Instead it was very common for Muslim governors to make their positions hereditary and gradually become more and more independent of their rulers until they became totally independent, and still use the same titles they used where they or their ancestors had been governors. Thus many titles have multiple meanings in Muslim societies. in India the most common title of Muslim rulers in the time of the later Mughal empire and the British Raj was Nawab.

Nawab (Bengali: নবাব/নওয়াব, Sylheti Nagari: ꠘꠀꠣꠛ, ꠘꠛꠣꠛ, Devanagari: नवाब/नबाब, Perso-Arab: نواب) also spelt Nawaab, Navaab, Navab, Nowab, Nabob or Nobab, was an honorific title ratified and bestowed by the reigning Mughal emperor to semi-autonomous Muslim rulers of princely states in South Asia.

"Nawab" usually refers to males and literally means Viceroy; the female equivalent is "Begum" or "Nawab Begum". The primary duty of a Nawab was to uphold the sovereignty of the Mughal emperor along with the administration of a certain province.

The title of "nawabi" was also awarded as a personal distinction by the paramount power, similar to a British peerage, to persons and families who ruled a princely state for various services to the government of British India. In some cases, the titles were also accompanied by jagir grants, either in cash revenues and allowances or land-holdings. During the British Raj, some of the chiefs, or sardars, of large or important tribes were also given the title, in addition to traditional titles already held by virtue of chieftainship.
Nawab - Wikipedia

So thus it is hard to decide which Nawabs should be considered kings and which should be considered of lower rank, or possibly of higher rank in a few cases.