Were the ancient Sumerian’s the architects of the Great Pyramid?

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,509
#81
Other than Egypt and South America, I'm not aware of any pyramids. The South American ones are probably ziggurats.
China for a start

Chinese pyramids - Wikipedia

then these

10 ancient pyramids around the world - HeritageDaily - Archaeology News

Monte d’Accoddi is an ancient megalithic structure in northern Sardinia, Italy and dates from around c. 4,000-3,650 BCE. The structure was initially built by the Ozieri culture, a prehistoric pre-Nuragic civilisation that constructed more than 200 related archaeological sites.

The Pyramids of Argolis, also referred to as the Greek Pyramids are pyramid-shaped monuments that are located in the Argolid plains in Greece.

Archaeologists have accounted for more than 255 pyramids, built across four royal pyramid field sites in Nubia (El-Kurru, Nuri, Meroe & Jebel Barkal or Gebel Barkal).

Many pre-Columbian Native American societies of ancient North America built large pyramidal earth structures known as platform mounds. Among the largest and best-known of these structures is Monks Mound at the site of Cahokia in what became Illinois, completed around 1100 CE, which has a base larger than that of the Great Pyramid at Giza.

Koh Ker is a remote temple site and former capital of the Khmer empire in northern Cambodia. The most distinct monument is the Prang, a seven‑tiered and 36-metre (118 ft) high pyramid,
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,598
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#82
If you put Rome in the club you have to add China.

The pyramid you can see in Rome is a copy, not an original architectural work. Romans copied a lot from the peoples they subjugated, so they copied the pyramid from the Egyptians ...

China is more interesting, anyway those constructions [imperial tombs] are not exactly pyramids, but a kind of burial mound.
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
34,487
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#84
China for a start

Chinese pyramids - Wikipedia

then these

10 ancient pyramids around the world - HeritageDaily - Archaeology News

Monte d’Accoddi is an ancient megalithic structure in northern Sardinia, Italy and dates from around c. 4,000-3,650 BCE. The structure was initially built by the Ozieri culture, a prehistoric pre-Nuragic civilisation that constructed more than 200 related archaeological sites.

The Pyramids of Argolis, also referred to as the Greek Pyramids are pyramid-shaped monuments that are located in the Argolid plains in Greece.

Archaeologists have accounted for more than 255 pyramids, built across four royal pyramid field sites in Nubia (El-Kurru, Nuri, Meroe & Jebel Barkal or Gebel Barkal).

Many pre-Columbian Native American societies of ancient North America built large pyramidal earth structures known as platform mounds. Among the largest and best-known of these structures is Monks Mound at the site of Cahokia in what became Illinois, completed around 1100 CE, which has a base larger than that of the Great Pyramid at Giza.

Koh Ker is a remote temple site and former capital of the Khmer empire in northern Cambodia. The most distinct monument is the Prang, a seven‑tiered and 36-metre (118 ft) high pyramid,
Earth mounds are hardly comparable to the Egyptian pyramids. Most of the other ones are acceptable but any in North Africa would seem to just be an extension of a similar culture to Ancient Egypt.
 

Corvidius

Ad Honorem
Jul 2017
2,910
Crows nest
#85
The Egyptian pyramid has not evolved from a mound, but from the mastaba tomb. The first pyramid, the Step Pyramid, being a series of the visible upper structure of the mastaba tomb placed one on top of the other. It represents light, not a heap of mud. The external appearance of their tombs are not analogs for the primeval mound or the mound that was the tomb of Osiris, which were represented in art by a dome.
 

AlpinLuke

Forum Staff
Oct 2011
26,598
Italy, Lago Maggiore
#86
The Egyptian pyramid has not evolved from a mound, but from the mastaba tomb. The first pyramid, the Step Pyramid, being a series of the visible upper structure of the mastaba tomb placed one on top of the other. It represents light, not a heap of mud. The external appearance of their tombs are not analogs for the primeval mound or the mound that was the tomb of Osiris, which were represented in art by a dome.
Exactly. As for I know burial mounds remained burial mounds, even if really very rich [like the Chinese ones], while mastaba tombs developed into pyramids. The Sumerian model showed a basic difference: it was overall a temple. As I've said in other occasions the South American pyramids were more similar to the Sumerian ones as for functional aspects than the Egyptian pyramids [on the top of the Egyptian pyramids there wasn't a temple ...].
 

tomar

Ad Honoris
Jan 2011
13,509
#87
Earth mounds are hardly comparable to the Egyptian pyramids.
Not so sure about that.... each culture used what it had at its disposal.... The egyptians did not have earth (it was needed for agriculture in the very narrow Nile valley) to spare, but they had plenty of rocks and plenty of space in the desert.... Others had plenty of earth, so they used it as building material instead of rocks (obviously its easier to build with -or at least to transport and elevate- earth than with rocks... although of course there are stability and erosion issues)
 
Mar 2019
1,448
Kansas
#88
Earth mounds are hardly comparable to the Egyptian pyramids. Most of the other ones are acceptable but any in North Africa would seem to just be an extension of a similar culture to Ancient Egypt.
I think Earth mounds do count. The only thing that changes is the medium being used. One could even argue dirt is harder to build like that because of the difficulty in stabilizing the slopes. Conversely a stone structure needs a deep understanding of geometry to achieve a result.

And from a concept standby point, any stone cairns etc would equally qualify (albeit substantially smaller) in demonstrating a peoples ability to pile things on top of other things
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
34,487
T'Republic of Yorkshire
#89
I think Earth mounds do count. The only thing that changes is the medium being used. One could even argue dirt is harder to build like that because of the difficulty in stabilizing the slopes. Conversely a stone structure needs a deep understanding of geometry to achieve a result.
The thing is, a tapering mound is the natural shape for an earthen mound - you can't exactly build a cuboid earth mound. Whereas the cultures that built pyramids could clearly build buildings in other shapes.
 
Mar 2019
1,448
Kansas
#90
The thing is, a tapering mound is the natural shape for an earthen mound - you can't exactly build a cuboid earth mound. Whereas the cultures that built pyramids could clearly build buildings in other shapes.
But that's the point I am trying to make. Virtually any culture can master the art of piling stuff on top of stuff. Yes the Egyptians did it with remarkable finesse, but we can see their basic and primitive starting point which was not much different to an earthen mound.

Compare this then with the ability to build arches and domes. Not many cultures mastered either and that can be a real way to differentiate 'secret' knowledge from intuitive building processes
 

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