Were there any benefits from Mongolian conquests? If any, what were they?

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,673
Florania
Mongolians, which were led by Genghis Khan and his immediate descendants, created the largest land-based empire ever.
We would often cite the destruction by these conquests, such as losses of infrastructure, cultural artifacts, population,
and even indigenous cultures.
Some have claimed that the Chinese civilization went downhill after the Mongolian conquests.
The question is: were there any benefits from Mongolian conquests?
What were the benefits if any?
How did Mongolian conquests change the course of history?
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
22,239
SoCal
Mongolian barbecue. ;)

In all seriousness, though, couldn't the Mongol invasions have allowed the Byzantines to last slightly longer than they otherwise would have? I seem to recall the Mongols forcing the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum to be their vassal state.
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,074
Lorraine tudesque
Mongolian barbecue. ;)

In all seriousness, though, couldn't the Mongol invasions have allowed the Byzantines to last slightly longer than they otherwise would have? I seem to recall the Mongols forcing the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum to be their vassal state.
I tried it this summer. Not bad.

 
Jan 2013
1,063
Toronto, Canada
If you believe in the fantasy of burning down society and starting over, the Mongols are your dream brought to life - followed shortly by your death.

Plus, Mongolian barbecue is great if you're in the right mood.
 

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,967
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
Mongolian barbecue. ;)

In all seriousness, though, couldn't the Mongol invasions have allowed the Byzantines to last slightly longer than they otherwise would have? I seem to recall the Mongols forcing the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum to be their vassal state.
I'm not sure that the good effects of the Seljuk defeat were worth the bad effects.

In the late 12th century the Seljuk Sultan of Rum began to conquer the other Turkish states in Asia Minor, becoming more powerful, and defeated the "Byzantine" empire at Myrocephalon in 1176. But the "Byzantine" empire rebounded and didn't suffer too much Turkish invasion as a result. The forces of Nicaea under Emperor Theodore I Lascaris defeated the Sultan of Rum at the Battle of Antioch on the Meander in June 1211, for example.

Here is a link to a map of the Empire in the time of Manuel I (r. 1143-1180): Atlas of Albania - Wikimedia Commons

Here is a link to a map of the growth of the Sultanate of Rum over time: Sultanate of Rum - Wikipedia

This shows that the defeat at Myrocephalon was bad for the "Byzantine" Empire and the Sultan of Rum was able to annex considerable territories from the "Byzantine" Empire after 1176. But in 1204 the Fourth Crusade captured Constantinople and the "Byzantine" empire fragmented into a number of much smaller and weaker successor states. So all of the Seljuk conquests after 1204 were conquered from various small fragments of the "Byzantine" empire and not from the united "Byzantine" empire from before 1204. Adn one of those small fragments, the "Empire of Nicaea", was able to defeat the Sultan of Rum in 1211 and retain its Asian territorsies mostly intact until the seljuks were defeated by the Mongols.

The Seljuk Sultanate of Rum was weakened by its defeat by the Mongols and began to break up into independent emirates, which should have been good for the "Byzantine" empire but the emirates bordering with the "Byzantine" Empire began to invade "Byzantine" territory and conquer it. Eventually one of those rebel Turkish emirates, the Ottoman one, began to invade Europe in 1355 and conquered the "Byzantine" empire in 1453.

So I am not certain that the Mongol defeat of the Seljuk Sultanate of Rum helped the "Byzantine" empire survive longer.
 
Sep 2012
1,121
Taiwan
Most modern (Western) scholarship on the Mongol Empire is overwhelmingly positive, particularly with regard to Mongol advances in science, technology, economics, religion and - in the opinions of some scholars - gender, among many others things. The view that the Mongol Empire was just one of death and destruction is rather outdated these days.
 

VHS

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
4,673
Florania
If you believe in the fantasy of burning down society and starting over, the Mongols are your dream brought to life - followed shortly by your death.

Plus, Mongolian barbecue is great if you're in the right mood.
Mongolian barbecue is a Taiwanese invention,

Most modern (Western) scholarship on the Mongol Empire is overwhelmingly positive, particularly with regard to Mongol advances in science, technology, economics, religion and - in the opinions of some scholars - gender, among many others things. The view that the Mongol Empire was just one of death and destruction is rather outdated these days.
Do you know about the history of Mongolian Barbecue as a person of Taiwan?
The Little Sheep Group originated from Inner Mongolia as a hotpot chain; from what I read, it has something to do with Inner Mongolian food culture.
 
Sep 2012
1,121
Taiwan
I am neither a person of Taiwan, nor someone who knows about Mongolian barbecue. Apologies.
 

Ichon

Ad Honorem
Mar 2013
3,708
Mongol invasions probably helped Europe more than most other areas because of a few things- reduced competition from rivals with central Asian and Chinese empires overthrown and interludes of anarchy in the following centuries, the spread of knowledge from the East to the West (mostly to due with trade potential) while China suffered immensely for awhile it also rebounded and the Mongol attempts at conquest of Japan and Vietnam strengthened those in feeling of national unity plus China had faced periodic invasions from the steppes for centuries- Mongols simply were more successful than most but China would most likely have suffered internal wars even if no Mongols had invaded. The Mongol domination of Russia but the use of Moscow to collect the tributes of other Rus kingdoms also set the stage for the rise of Russia and the expansion of European systems into central Asia even before British managed to take control of India.

Mongols were probably the worst for Islamic world as they wiped out several centuries-old centers of learning and convinced many that they were punishment for transgressions and led to renewed repression and calcification of Islamic practices and less tolerance overall which still echoes to the present time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Slavon