Were there any other parts of North America that used to be malarial swamps?

Kotromanic

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
4,570
Iowa USA
#14
350,000 , mostly in the highlands along the St. Johns River and in the Red hills around present day Tallahassee . Also in the Fort Myers area . Within 150 years they were all gone , mostly by European diseases .

Pretty remarkable adaptations to the coastal environment in SW Florida. Some excellent tool age engineering among that population.
 
Likes: Futurist
May 2017
43
florida
#15
There were some mounds in S.W. Florida that would have told us much about the tribes living there , but most were tore down and used for fill dirt for early builders , same same for Miami area. Lots of history . Back in the late fifties when I knew no better we would get on our motorcycles and ride down to Turtle Mound in So. Volusia and dig into the mounds .
There is a State Park there now and sometimes an archaeological dig .
 
Likes: Futurist

MAGolding

Ad Honorem
Aug 2015
2,710
Chalfont, Pennsylvania
#16
The yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia in 1793 that killed at least one of my ancestors was caused by sailors with yellow fever from tropical ports being bitten by local mosquitoes which then spread the yellow fever to the people they bit. So I assume that the Philadelphia region was sufficiently swampy for mosquitoes to sometimes spread malaria. Some of my relatives lived in Falkner Swamp in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania back in the 18th century.

The New Jersey coast has lots of barrier islands separated from the mainland by back bays which often contain vast marshes. Back around 1960 mosquitoes were very common in Cape May, New Jersey and trucks used to travel the streets spraying insecticide, and foolish children used to follow the trucks breathing in the spray.

In the 19th century many Indian tribes and groups were relocated by the government, usually to The Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. Sites that were considered or selected for various tribes were sometimes criticized for being "malarial", meaning either that malaria cases were known in the area and/or that it was swampy.

A famous swamp is the Great Dismal Swamp on the border of Virginia and North Carolina.

The Okefenokee Swamp is on the border of Georgia and Florida.

There are many swamps along the lower Mississippi River and used to be more. As I remember the Vicksburg Campaign in the US Civil War was made more difficult because of the swamps occupying several approach routes to Vicksburg.

So these are some examples of swamps in the USA outside of Florida I was able to think of within a few minutes.
 
Likes: Futurist
Feb 2019
326
Pennsylvania, US
#17
As far as Native peoples go, there are populations with genetic variants that create a resistance to malaria - today this has become a very relevant issue as drug-resistance is appearing in malaria protozoans. This could explain a higher population in Florida prior to the arrival of Europeans.

Also, places that grew rice (colonial North Carolina comes to mind - but perhaps Florida as well?) were also prone to higher cases of malaria, simply because the rice fields are perfect habitats for the mosquitoes that spread the parasite.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,806
SoCal
#18
As far as Native peoples go, there are populations with genetic variants that create a resistance to malaria - today this has become a very relevant issue as drug-resistance is appearing in malaria protozoans. This could explain a higher population in Florida prior to the arrival of Europeans.

Also, places that grew rice (colonial North Carolina comes to mind - but perhaps Florida as well?) were also prone to higher cases of malaria, simply because the rice fields are perfect habitats for the mosquitoes that spread the parasite.
FYI, we can't talk about genetics on this forum.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
16,806
SoCal
#19
350,000 , mostly in the highlands along the St. Johns River and in the Red hills around present day Tallahassee . Also in the Fort Myers area . Within 150 years they were all gone , mostly by European diseases .
That's still over 50 times less than Florida's current population, though.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,102
Sydney
#20
the Yazoo delta was a malarial death zone ,
when drained it became one of the most productive agricultural land of the US