Were there any Southerners who fought for Union during Civil War ?

Scaeva

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,392
#11
There were also Southern Unionists who didn't take up arms against their native state.

Sam Houston is probably the most prominent of those.

Although Houston was a slave owner and opposed abolition, he opposed the secession of Texas from the Union. An elected convention voted to secede from the United States on February 1, 1861, and Texas joined the Confederate States of America on March 2, 1861. Houston refused to recognize its legality, but the Texas legislature upheld the legitimacy of secession. The political forces that brought about Texas's secession were powerful enough to replace the state's Unionist governor. Houston chose not to resist, stating, "I love Texas too well to bring civil strife and bloodshed upon her. To avert this calamity, I shall make no endeavor to maintain my authority as Chief Executive of this State, except by the peaceful exercise of my functions ... " He was evicted from his office on March 16, 1861, for refusing to take an oath of loyalty to the Confederacy, writing in an undelivered speech,

Fellow-Citizens, in the name of your rights and liberties, which I believe have been trampled upon, I refuse to take this oath. In the name of the nationality of Texas, which has been betrayed by the Convention, I refuse to take this oath. In the name of the Constitution of Texas, I refuse to take this oath. In the name of my own conscience and manhood, which this Convention would degrade by dragging me before it, to pander to the malice of my enemies, I refuse to take this oath. I deny the power of this Convention to speak for Texas....I protest....against all the acts and doings of this convention and I declare them null and void.
After leaving the Governor's mansion, Houston traveled to Galveston. Along the way, many people demanded an explanation for his refusal to support the Confederacy. On April 19, 1861 from a hotel window he told a crowd:

Let me tell you what is coming. After the sacrifice of countless millions of treasure and hundreds of thousands of lives, you may win Southern independence if God be not against you, but I doubt it. I tell you that, while I believe with you in the doctrine of states rights, the North is determined to preserve this Union. They are not a fiery, impulsive people as you are, for they live in colder climates. But when they begin to move in a given direction, they move with the steady momentum and perseverance of a mighty avalanche; and what I fear is, they will overwhelm the South.
 
Jul 2012
4,379
Here
#12
Lincoln's Loyalists
The 150,000 black men from Confederate states who served in the Union Army would be about 35-40% of the draft age black men. That must have really hurt the Confederate economy.
I stated the black numbers sloppily. Dentatus has it right that 100,000 blacks were from the Confederate states. Unlike how I divided white men into Confederate and border state men, the 150,000 "southern black men" I stated is about what I remember for black Confederate state men and black border state men. I always try to use "Confederate states" and "border states" (and also "free states") so its clear what I'm saying, but I wasn't paying attention when I typed that up. Using "northern" and "southern" often confuses the issue.

But still, even 100,000 blacks from the Confederate states is going to put a hurting on the Confederate economy and the tens of thousands of ex-slave women who were in Union "Contraband" camps and no longer in the Confederate fields makes it worse.
 

Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
3,995
Texas
#13
As always with anything related to the Civil War, I am stunned by the level of information available here. :):):) You guys are amazing
 
Oct 2015
673
Virginia
#14
"Dyers Compendium of the War of the Rebellion" shows the following enlistments in the US Army, Navy and Marines from Confederate states:
...
US Volunteers 243 (so called "galvanized yankees"..ex confederate soldiers)
This is an error. Dyer only shows DEATHS in the US Volunteers. Other sources indicate that at least 5600 ex confederate soldiers (mostly POWs) enlisted in the US Volunteers, enough to form six regiments which were used mostly on the Western frontier. A few others enlisted in the US Navy and Marines, and ~800 enlisted in State volunteer regiments of the US Army.
 
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royal744

Ad Honorem
Jul 2013
9,516
San Antonio, Tx
#15
I have an ancestor who fought in a Union Tennessee regiment. They were from the eastern TN region that you mention and this was not a move in opposition to his neighbors. All of the folks around there were Unionists.

Interestingly enough, I was doing a seminar yesterday on German immigration in Texas during its days as a Republic. At that time about 10,000 Germans were brought in, many of whom settled the Hill Country around New Braunfels and Fredericksburg west of Austin. They were anti-slavery people and when Texas joined the USA the new state mostly stopped encouraging them to come over. Anyway, even though there were a number who served for the south (one of my ancestors did and fought on the NM campaign, another served in the frontier forts.), most of the Germans were also considered Unionists. When the war ended a lot of southerners came to West Texas, many were quite bitter about losing the war. Here is a sample from Die Kettner Briefe (letters from a German out there at the time).

“This was the beginning from which the fanaticism between the native-born Americans and the immigrants grew to the highest degree. The end of the matter was that we got martial law, likewise the necessary number of soldiers, under whose jurisdiction the most horrible murders were committed. I myself was no longer certain of my life and for a long time kept myself hidden. This situation lasted a long half year in which I was often prepared to take off for Mexico. Only my family kept me back. During this time approximately 25 people were killed, some drowned and others captured and executed without any sort of trial, naturally all secretly in the night. In the morning the men would then be found hanged from the trees.”
There is only one monument to the Union in Texas. It is located in Comfort, Texas. It memorializes the horrible execution of the children of German settlers. They were killed trying to escape to Mexico because they refused to be conscripted into the Confederate army. No one flies a Confederate flag in Comfort. Ever.

I used to know the number of Southerners who fought for the Union - the number is very high but I don’t recall it.

I have no confidence that the southern states that held secession elections did so in any manner that was legitimate - there was so much fraud and intimidation going on that whatever the “results” were, were probably faked. There were, as I recall, Northerners who fought for the South, but the numbers were quite small. A lot of the North’s armies had general officers who were Southerners.

The Massachusetts black regiments came mostly from there but did have escaped slaves from the South in it.
 

Baltis

Ad Honorem
Dec 2011
3,995
Texas
#17
There is only one monument to the Union in Texas. It is located in Comfort, Texas. It memorializes the horrible execution of the children of German settlers. They were killed trying to escape to Mexico because they refused to be conscripted into the Confederate army. No one flies a Confederate flag in Comfort. Ever.

I used to know the number of Southerners who fought for the Union - the number is very high but I don’t recall it.

I have no confidence that the southern states that held secession elections did so in any manner that was legitimate - there was so much fraud and intimidation going on that whatever the “results” were, were probably faked. There were, as I recall, Northerners who fought for the South, but the numbers were quite small. A lot of the North’s armies had general officers who were Southerners.

The Massachusetts black regiments came mostly from there but did have escaped slaves from the South in it.
Interesting detail on the Germans. In fact, the incident you mention is also a part of the same letter I quoted about the murders. It is referred to in WIKI as the Nueces massacre. Actually just before the prior paragraph: "the start began with the conscription law for 18 to 35 year olds. Approximately 60 young men from Fredericksburg and the surrounding area tried to get away by taking off for Mexico. they were overtaken by a greater number of militia and lost in a two hour battle in which they fought against a twice-as-large number. Fifteen wee dead on the battlefield. The rest, with the wounded, struck out to Mexico and enlisted from there in the US Army in the so called Texas Calvary Brigade. I lost five very good friends in this combat."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nueces_massacre
 

Attachments

Dec 2011
2,800
Late Cretaceous
#18
There hade been a sizable degree of immigration into Missouri from the South in the years prior to the Civil War. so much so that a band of counties in the state were known as "Little Dixie".

Missouri was the scene of an extremely bitter Civil War between pro-Union forces and Confederate "Bushwackers"

Clay County was the home of the James-Younger Gang who carried on after the end of the War.



One Southern born immigrant to Missouri who sided with the North was Frederick Benteen. Benteen ended the War in command of the 10th Missouri Cavalry, but is better remembered today as one of the principal participants in the Battle of the Little Big Horn.

Community and Conflict » Archive » Bushwhackers and Jayhawkers
 
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Jul 2017
212
Sydney
#20
Who fought on which side in the Civil War pretty much depended on multiple factors.

First, there was what position you personally had on the issue at contention.

Second, what family and region you come from, basically your background.

Third, in some cases friends just followed other friends as they felt compelled thinking they were of fighting age.

Personal circumstance, last of all, as in many instances southern men went to West Point and had good positions in the federal army (which was basically the Union army in the civil war)

There could definitely be other factors involved and if I did miss them please feel free to add to the list