What are some examples of humanitarian intervention the early United States required?

Jan 2017
4
United States
I read an interested question posed by the author of book which mentioned with all the criticism directed at the United States for intervening in foreign countries, people tend to forget about the intervention that the early United States required to become the world power it is today.

What are some examples of this? Thank you.
 
Jan 2017
4
United States
This is a legitimate question, not anything to do with my studies. It's been 5 years since my last history course. I haven't found any examples or anyone who could give me an example apart from the American Revolution.

From what I've gathered the United States did not become a significant world power until the late 1800's. In that century between the Revolution and that time period, were there instances when other countries assisted us in ways similar to what the United States does today to smaller countries?

Considering I haven't been able to find anyone able to give me an example of intervention towards the United States I don't see how you can be so quick to "belittle" my knowledge of this history.

Edit: You want my source, this question was posed by Christopher Hitchens in an article in Foreign Affairs in September of 2008. "...I found myself rotating a seldom-asked question in my head: What about the days when the United States was the recipient, not the donor, of humanitarian solidarity?"

Considering this man has studied history for the greater part of his life, I don't see how a question such as this is so elementary it is dismissed as "homework". I wish I had been taught this in the sad institutions we are educated in today.
 
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Tulius

Ad Honorem
May 2016
6,040
Portugal
“What are some examples of humanitarian intervention the early United States required?”

Interesting question and I don’ know the answer.

I haven't found any examples or anyone who could give me an example apart from the American Revolution.
But can the support provided by France and Spain to the revolutionaries be considered “humanitarian”?

Edit: You want my source, this question was posed by Christopher Hitchens in an article in Foreign Affairs in September of 2008. "...I found myself rotating a seldom-asked question in my head: What about the days when the United States was the recipient, not the donor, of humanitarian solidarity?"
That is a puzzling quote. We, in the forum, will have to wait that the “homework” will be made before we can know more about it.
 
Jun 2015
579
Camelot
Assuming the author is right and this isn't about a test (I really don't think this is a homework question):

The Mexican American War.

The M-A war was fought in theory to help protect the Republic of Texas and Texans in the border regions and resulted in a massive expansion of territory for the US. Without that territory, both oil and massive agricultural and living quarters would have not entered the US's domain.
 

Asherman

Forum Staff
May 2013
3,410
Albuquerque, NM
Of course, winning the War for American Independence depended heavily on French support. France supplied much of wherewithal to keep the Continental Army in the field, and without the French fleet just off shore, Yorktown would not have been so decisive. Since that time, the US has mostly been on its own. That isn't surprising , since until the late 19th century the prevailing American attitudes was primarily isolationist. We might have benefited by a coalition of Europeans to defeat the Barbary Pirates, but no one stepped forward. The US was already a maritime power trading around the world, when the Spanish-American War made the US a Colonial Power in Asia. Most Americans were ambivalent about occupying the Philippines, though that prevented the Islands from France, Britain, Germany, Japan, and Russia. None of those disappointed suitors intervened on America's behalf in the war with Spain.

1. The British, though neutral, built and supplied armed raiders to the Confederate Navy. The assistance rendered was not enough to turn the tide, nor open Southern ports for the export of cotton.

2. During the Apache Wars, the US and Mexico made allowance for "hot pursuit when a raiding band crossed from one nation to the other. Mostly the US Army operated in Northern Mexico, but on occasion, Mexican military briefly chased bands North of the Border. Neither Canada nor Mexico intervened on behalf of Native Americans during the Indian Wars.

These seem like small and inconsequential compared to the willingness of the US to support and assist other nations for over 240 years. I could think of no instance where any foreign nations provided humanitarian assistance to the the US. At the edge of my consciousness is a vague memory a long forgotten footnote that said in effect a certain small country on hearing of a natural disaster within the US sent their own relief packages to help. Maybe it will come to me later when I'm napping. The older you get the harder it is to keep track of all the little bits you've learned.

Now on an entirely different matter: A Mod came across this thread early, and on its face it is almost identical to the many questions posed by lazy students. They wait until their assignments are due, become members here and hope that our members will bail them out. The question was asked if the other mods concurred, and frankly we were unable to agree whether this was a homework violation, or a misunderstanding. The Mods did agree that TimbO is new and in this instance given the benefit of our doubts. For what its worth, I'm more often clumsy at this than the more senior Mods.