What are the root causes of anti semitism in Enlightened Western world ?

Apr 2014
338
Istanbul Turkey
#1
When ever populist discussion about any political matter initiated , one or two or maybe mor antisemitics starts "Jews this Jews that" etc. I am wonering why ? What are the main causes , reasons , factors that distinctly segrages and damns Jewish minorities in mind of so many in western world ? In Middle East I can understand why , it goes all the way to creation of Israel and populist politics in that region with Palastine situation. But in West ? why ? Why Jewish minorties who mostly not adapted but assimilated to their host cultures either in Europe or in US , what makes them so disliked , so distinctly apart and alien in eyes of racists ? Is it religious ? Wasn't Christ a Jew ? Is it their occupation of finances , banking etc creating stereotypical Jew the Shylock ? Is it reactionist blowback against Enlightenment , French Revolution , social democratic policies that caused old style conservatism to lose more and more so they scapegoated them ? Or is there anmy other reason ?
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,377
US
#2
As a Christian, I do believe the idea of the Jews as the "killer of Christ" has been perpetrated, if not officially by the church, then through the everyday faithful. Furthermore, the idea of the Jews - one God, put them outside the main stream of thought since the days of Rome and before. The people of Israel presented themselves in those days, as "other." Then in the course of history since the sack of Jerusalem in 70 CE, there was a belief among many that the Jews were the purveyors of usury and unfair practices in their professions, which were in the majority nations: that of proprietors, professionals and tradesmen. This created a sort of jealousy and resentment among the peasantry. To add to this, in many places - like Poland, the Jews tended to segregate themselves. Finally, many have argued that bolshevism was predominated by Jews. In the USA today, many believe that the entertainment and finance industries are dominated by Jews. From my experience, these are the kind of arguments I have heard as to why people are anti Semitic.
 
Feb 2016
4,180
Japan
#3
Main reasons are ...
pig headead stupidity of simpletons- very quick to believe in any dross they read on the internet.

Left wing hatred of Israel

Israel’s actions and existence.

High achieviements of prominent Jews and general above average wealth levels ... jealousy.
 
Oct 2015
332
Belfast
#4
1290 King Edward I (Longshanks) expels the Jews from England.

Edward I Expells the Jews from England : HistoryofInformation.com

One portion of the text I find really disturbing. History has repeated itself. Nazi Germany is the case in point.

"The situation only got worse for Jews as the 13th century progressed. In 1218, England became the first European nation to require Jews to wear a marking badge. Taxation grew increasingly intense. Between 1219 and 1272, 49 levies were imposed on Jews for a total of 200,000 marks, a huge amount of money. The first major step towards expulsion took place in 1275, with the Statute of Jewry. The statute outlawed all usury and gave Jews fifteen years to readjust. However, guilds as well as popular prejudice made Jewish movement into mercantile or agricultural pursuits almost impossible".
 
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Recusant

Ad Honorem
Sep 2009
2,624
Sector N after curfew
#5
Perhaps the origins of European antisemitism can be traced back to the period when Christianity became the state religion of Rome. In particular one could cite the principle or doctrine of Servitus Judaeorum as expounded in the Codex Justinianus. That is not to say that previously the Roman empire had been entirely tolerant of Judaism, but it seems to have become much harsher during this era, firmly establishing systematic discrimination against Jews.

Once the pattern was set, it continued: Jews generally refused to give up their religion and convert to Christianity. This refusal was an ongoing source of friction between them and the Christian majority. The antisemitism promoted by Martin Luther in his later years certainly had an effect as well.
 
Jan 2010
4,283
Atlanta, Georgia USA
#6
I wish I knew. Some people very near to me are infected with anti-Semitism and there is no reasoning with them (or them with me for that matter).
But I do think it has gotten and is getting worse.
 
May 2015
1,299
Germany
#7
"The situation only got worse for Jews as the 13th century progressed. In 1218, England became the first European nation to require Jews to wear a marking badge.
The first European "nation" that introduced that practice was Muslim Analusia, which forced Jews to wear yellow badges or caps. Don't know if that was already in practice during Umayyad times, but it was at least during the Almoravid and Almohad period (11th-early 13th century).
 
Nov 2010
7,332
Cornwall
#8
The first European "nation" that introduced that practice was Muslim Analusia, which forced Jews to wear yellow badges or caps. Don't know if that was already in practice during Umayyad times, but it was at least during the Almoravid and Almohad period (11th-early 13th century).
The Visigoths from around 600AD on were more rabidly anti-jewish than anything that followed except the Almohads. But I don't think they were as good as the Almohads in enforcing their ban, hence an ever-increasing and more frantic raft of laws against them and anyone sheltering them.

Regarding other posts above Caligula's deportations were one of the early orgins of Sephardic jews, as were the later deportations after the Jewish revolt.

Whatever the specific local reasons anywhere the underlying cause is that they stay 'different' from everyone else. People who are 'different' are always targets for discrimination.
 
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caldrail

Ad Honorem
Feb 2012
5,150
#9
Agreed, but there was also religious discrimination. Even the First Crusade, fired up by christian passion and Pope Urban II's license for warfare - plus a desire to grab land and booty - indulged in pogroms along the way. The modern state of Israel? Nothing to do with it other than older bigotries have a new focus.
 
Sep 2015
1,607
England
#10
'Around the start of the 19th century, various factors led to a more positive image of the Jews in England...Despite powerful opposition, there was a gradual move towards religious toleration for the Jews.'

These factors will have been and are the Enlightenment, and Christianity.

It appears the Jews acquired land back in the 1200s through loan defaults (and purchase). They were the only ones allowed to engage in usury, which to many appeared an unfair advantage evidently, in making money and acquiring land. They were therefore (following the logic) banned from engaging in usury. They were also however and subsequent to that expelled from England, and were not officially permitted to return until the Commonwealth years of the mid-1600s!

The Enlightenment probably had its work cut out so to speak.
 

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