What are you reading? v.2

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
4,987
US
I just started reading this, a book that combines two of my biggest loves: history and cuisine.
Food and Drink in Medieval Poland, by Maria Dembinska, translated by Magdalena Thomas, revised and adapted by William Woys Weaver. Originally published in 1963, the English translation is dated from 1999, University of Penn Press, Philadelphia.
 
Sep 2012
8,640
India
In continuation of my post no.1910 above, a quote from Will Durant's book:-
" In the end, we meet death. Just as experience begins to coordinate itself into wisdom, brain and body begin to decay.----it is clear that our walking is admittedly nothing but a constantly prevented falling, so the life of our bodies is nothing but a constantly prevented dying, an ever postponed death.----The fear of death is the beginning of philosophy and the final cause of religion."
 
Oct 2016
838
Merryland
'Brazil: The Fortunes of War' by Neill Lochery

Brazil during WWII. gist of it is that strongman Vargas tried to play Germany off against the allies with mixed success.

Vargas correctly broke with the axis and joined the allies, even sending a combat force to Italy, but wartime shortages, especially food and fuel (pretty much world wide) kept Brazil's economy from booming and led to his loss of power.

Apparently there was a very real fear that Germany would use the Azores and Canaries to invade Brazil and get a toe-hold in the Americas! today it sounds absurd that the nazis that couldn't jump twenty miles of English Channel might cross the Atlantic but a lot of people thought it could happen.
a more realistic fear was that the pro-axis and longtime foe Argentina might take advantage of the war and invade from the South. Vargas ultimately was able to get enough gear to equip his army (never got everything he wanted of course). doesn't sound like Argentina seriously considered such a move.

interesting book about an underdiscussed topic, WWII in Latin America. looking forward to upcoming book 'The Tango War' about same.
 
Jan 2014
1,675
Portugal
'Brazil: The Fortunes of War' by Neill Lochery

Brazil during WWII. gist of it is that strongman Vargas tried to play Germany off against the allies with mixed success.

Vargas correctly broke with the axis and joined the allies, even sending a combat force to Italy, but wartime shortages, especially food and fuel (pretty much world wide) kept Brazil's economy from booming and led to his loss of power.

Apparently there was a very real fear that Germany would use the Azores and Canaries to invade Brazil and get a toe-hold in the Americas! today it sounds absurd that the nazis that couldn't jump twenty miles of English Channel might cross the Atlantic but a lot of people thought it could happen.
a more realistic fear was that the pro-axis and longtime foe Argentina might take advantage of the war and invade from the South. Vargas ultimately was able to get enough gear to equip his army (never got everything he wanted of course). doesn't sound like Argentina seriously considered such a move.

interesting book about an underdiscussed topic, WWII in Latin America. looking forward to upcoming book 'The Tango War' about same.
Very interesting recomendation.
There's some good books from Lochery about Portugal, from WWII period. Hope this one is good also because I'm into South America in WWII.
Any about Argentina during WWII?
 

Belgarion

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,435
Australia
"Two Years On The Alabama" by Leut. Arthur Sinclair CSN. A memoir written by the navigator of the Confederate raider Alabama. Published in 1896 it give an interesting perspective on life at sea during the ACW. The author does not dwell so much on the combat side of things but concentrates on describing the day to day running of the ship, the ships company, the ports visited and the problems of resupply and disposing of prisoners from captured vessels. Fascinating stuff, even if the 19th century attitude towards women, blacks and the lower classes like common seamen is very condescending and paternalistic.
 
Oct 2016
838
Merryland
Very interesting recomendation.
There's some good books from Lochery about Portugal, from WWII period. Hope this one is good also because I'm into South America in WWII.
Any about Argentina during WWII?
none that I'm aware of.
I'm sure there are domestic Spanish-language that I don't have access to.
 

rvsakhadeo

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
8,640
India
My interest in the Himalayas continues unabated. My wife had the luck in getting to travel to Kailas and Mansarovar via Nepal, through a private tour operator. This was when she was much younger i.e. when she was 49. When their party crossed into Tibet, it was taken charge of by a Chinese operator. Though their passports were taken away without any receipts, they were otherwise treated satisfactorily by the Chinese. My wife did the ritual of obeisance at Dolma pass ( height above M.S.L.5955 meters ) by lighting a lamp etc., offering money as well as pieces of our old clothes and so on. Then they travelled to Mansarovar, a huge freshwater lake, of religious significance, where all had ritual baths. She then returned happily, her passport being returned at the Nepal-Tibet border. I could not go because of fitness problems.
The point of telling all this is that I have yearned to go to these places in Tibet, unfortunately, at my age, it is no longer possible. That's why I purchased Colin Thubron's book'To a Mountain in Tibet', published by Vintage in 2012, ISBN 978-0-099-53264-4. I am reading it now. It is a superior travel book and most highly recommended, to lovers of Himalayan travel books.