What can you tell me about the Weimar Republic's Fall and Hitler's Rise?

Mar 2017
1
Sterling, VA
I'm planning on writing a screenplay about Fritz and Thea Von Harbou. The former was a prominent writer and director in the film making scene of 1920s Germany. The latter was a talented actress and novelist with severe concerns with Germany's situation at the time. Meeting and working together, they fell in love

Among the other projects was Metropolis, a science fictional masterpiece that was - in 1927 - their joint creation. Put succinctly? In a futuristic city where the elite enjoy great luxury while the workers toil underground, the son of the city's mastermind falls in love with a saintly socialist reformer. It has often been described at Fritz Lang's masterpiece... although he would later disown it.

As Germany suffered painful economic dislocation made worse by the Great Depression, the appeal of the Nazi Party grew. Thea Von Harbou was sympathetic, thinking they might be the answer to Germany's problems. Fritz Lang found them to be problematic partly because of the Jewish Heritage on his mother's side. They had a falling out over the matter well before she actually joined them.

Eventually Goebbals - the Nazi Propaganda Minister - would meet with Fritz Lang, telling him that although his film The Testament of Dr Mabuse was banned, the Party enjoyed his other films - especially Metropolis enough that the offer to join the party was open. Fritz declined the offer politely before emigrating to America as quickly as possible. It's with that meeting that my screenplay opens.

What I'm wanting to learn on this forum is whatever I need to about life in Weimar Germany and the events which contributed to Hitler's Rise. Can you tell me?
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,632
Las Vegas, NV USA
What I'm wanting to learn on this forum is whatever I need to about life in Weimar Germany and the events which contributed to Hitler's Rise. Can you tell me?
Your question is way too broad and the answers could easily fill a book. There's plenty of of information out there in book form and some decent on line sources.

Bare bones summary: The depression hit Germany very hard. Unemployment soared to levels not yet seen in other countries. This led to the more extreme political parties taking support away from the centrist parties. There were the Nazies on the right and the Communists on the left. The Nazies had enough support to possibly form a government, but President Hindenberg blocked them in favor of a centrist minority government.

Hitler decided to run for president himself in 1932 but lost to Hindenberg. Thereafter, Hitler's SA created a lot of disorder along with far leftists. Hindenberg had three governments fall in six months. Finally, he was forced to appoint a coalition government with Hitler as co-chancellor. A few days later the german parliament building was set on fire by an arsonist. Hitler effectively declared marital law and took over.

You can read up on the details.
 
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pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,784
Y The depression hit Germany very hard. Unemployment soared to levels not yet seen in other countries.
Disagree, employment in Germany was broadly in line with quite a few other countries.

(source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Depression#Germany)

Germany - Widespread unemployment reached 25

Australia - Unemployment reached a record high of 29% in 1932,
Canada - Unemployment reached 27% at the depth of the Depression in 1933
Britain - By the end of 1930 unemployment had more than doubled from 1 million to 2.5 million (20% of the insured workforce)
USA - By 1932, unemployment had reached 23.6%, peaking in early 1933 at 25%
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,632
Las Vegas, NV USA
Disagree, employment in Germany was broadly in line with quite a few other countries.

(source - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Depression#Germany)

Germany - Widespread unemployment reached 25

Australia - Unemployment reached a record high of 29% in 1932,
Canada - Unemployment reached 27% at the depth of the Depression in 1933
Britain - By the end of 1930 unemployment had more than doubled from 1 million to 2.5 million (20% of the insured workforce)
USA - By 1932, unemployment had reached 23.6%, peaking in early 1933 at 25%
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Depression#Germany

This source says 30% in Germany in 1932. In any case, I said "other countries", not all other countries. You cited the same source. Read a little further. The point is that it had significant political consequences in Germany.
 
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pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,784
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Depression#Germany

This source says 30% in Germany in 1932. In any case, I said "other countries", not all other countries. You cited the same source. Read a little further. The point is that it had significant political consequences in Germany.
Still "soared to levels yet not seen in other countries" it me seems to bel implying that the effects were MUCH worse in Germany, which is not the case. The unemployment were broadly similar with many countries , and if German figures were the worst not by very much and not for very long.

The Rise of the Nazis were not just the unemployment which certainly had an effect, but the context in Germany was much different, Governments had been ruling by decree without much reference to parliament, there was always a significant political forces (both left and right) which were opposed to parliamentary democracy of the weimar republic (very large parties which were opposed to basic constitution and pretty much looking to bring down the state, right form the start, German democracy did not have very deep roots) the Hyper inflation of the early 20s had destroyed middle class savings, and general faith in the economy , so the Germans had less belief that the system would right itself than elsewhere.
 

stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,632
Las Vegas, NV USA
The Rise of the Nazis were not just the unemployment which certainly had an effect, but the context in Germany was much different, Governments had been ruling by decree without much reference to parliament, there was always a significant political forces (both left and right) which were opposed to parliamentary democracy of the weimar republic (very large parties which were opposed to basic constitution and pretty much looking to bring down the state, right form the start, German democracy did not have very deep roots) the Hyper inflation of the early 20s had destroyed middle class savings, and general faith in the economy , so the Germans had less belief that the system would right itself than elsewhere.
Well yes. My intension was to highlight some of the key facts. What I didn't say was that Hindenberg was monarchist. After he won re-election he appointed his unpopular "cabinet of barons". This lasted just a few months. It was replaced by a conservative/nationalist coalition headed by von Papen. In December Hindenberg dismissed von Papen and appointed General von Schleicher Chancellor. Von Papen met with Hitler in January and they agreed to propose a coalition government. Hindenberg finally gave in and appointed Hitler Chancellor. Von Papen was to be Vice Chancellor to act as a check on Hitler. Only three other Nazies were allowed to serve in the cabinet. Then came the fire.

There are many other relevant facts. Like I said, it could fill a book. For instance the Nazies already controlled the government (including the police force) of the state of Prussia in which Berlin was located.
 
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stevev

Ad Honorem
Apr 2017
3,632
Las Vegas, NV USA
Correction to the above. Von Papen's cabinet was the Cabinet of Barons. After Hindenburg was re-elected he kept the incumbent Bruning in office until June,1932. So there were still three governments between Hindenburg's re-election and the appointment of Hitler: Bruning, von Papen and General von Schleicher.
 
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Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,790
Republika Srpska
I think it's fair to say that a combination of the Versailles humiliation, the Depression and the far-right nationalism led to the rise of the Nazis. The Depression helped their rise to power, but the nationalism and revanchism factors were always there, even during the Goldene Zwanziger when the German nationalists accused the government of decadence and destroying German values. Just look at the Institute of Sex Research closed by the Nazis.
 

JoanOfArc007

Ad Honorem
Dec 2015
3,978
USA
Your question is way too broad and the answers could easily fill a book. There's plenty of of information out there in book form and some decent on line sources.

Bare bones summary: The depression hit Germany very hard. Unemployment soared to levels not yet seen in other countries. This led to the more extreme political parties taking support away from the centrist parties. There were the Nazies on the right and the Communists on the left. The Nazies had enough support to possibly form a government, but President Hindenberg blocked them in favor of a centrist minority government.

Hitler decided to run for president himself in 1932 but lost to Hindenberg. Thereafter, Hitler's SA created a lot of disorder along with far leftists. Hindenberg had three governments fall in six months. Finally, he was forced to appoint a coalition government with Hitler as co-chancellor. A few days later the german parliament building was set on fire by an arsonist. Hitler effectively declared marital law and took over.

You can read up on the details.
The German national socialists did not declare themselves as right or left, rather they were known as the NSDAP. One perhaps can interpret the Reich as being left or right but not everyone in the world agrees on what constitutes leftist or rightist viewpoints.