What caused dogs to attack their owner?

Jul 2016
8,634
USA
#33
you can say the same thing about people. the largest cause of infants being killed are relatives killing them.
He's talking about a specific dog breed notorious for violence, ones that were historicallly bred for efficiency in killing things, size, musculature, bite force, and aggression, bred largely for dog fighting, who in last 20 years or so have become popular as house pets by people who typically don't know their dog's pedigree and history prior to adoption. That breed are unsafe. Treat the pitbull perfectly and all it takes is a toothache or stomach pain when the dog just isn't having any and a 100 lb killing machine goes to its instincts. People sometimes, but especially other smaller animals, other dogs (which the pitbull is bred to kill).

Even if the dog appears kind and gentle all it takes it was unfortunate day and that's it. Especially two of them, together there is no way an unarmed skinny woman who isn't trained how to kill dogs with bare hands is going to survive an attack by multiple pitbulls.
 
Oct 2013
6,153
Planet Nine, Oregon
#34
He's talking about a specific dog breed notorious for violence, ones that were historicallly bred for efficiency in killing things, size, musculature, bite force, and aggression, bred largely for dog fighting, who in last 20 years or so have become popular as house pets by people who typically don't know their dog's pedigree and history prior to adoption. That breed are unsafe. Treat the pitbull perfectly and all it takes is a toothache or stomach pain when the dog just isn't having any and a 100 lb killing machine goes to its instincts. People sometimes, but especially other smaller animals, other dogs (which the pitbull is bred to kill).

Even if the dog appears kind and gentle all it takes it was unfortunate day and that's it. Especially two of them, together there is no way an unarmed skinny woman who isn't trained how to kill dogs with bare hands is going to survive an attack by multiple pitbulls.
That, and it's possible that spending time with the father changed the father to the "head of the pack" in the dogs' minds, and they weren't going to be subservient to the daughter after that. If she tried to discipline them after that period, she may have been challenged by one of the dogs and then bit, and the rest followed. Perhaps as others have mentioned, the father encouraged violence in the dogs, but as you say, they are bred to kill.

All that aside, I LOVE dogs. Cats are good too.
 
Mar 2014
1,877
Lithuania
#35
they weren't raised by her from birth. one was obtained at about 8 weeks and the other was obtained much later, despite apparently being a sibling. https://nypost.com/2017/12/20/trainer-reveals-why-dogs-may-have-mauled-owner-to-death/

There's plenty to indicate problems here. the dogs were rescues, which means that no information was available regarding what the breeding program was for the parents (if there was any) and therefore while these specific dogs hadn't been bred for dog fighting, it's unknown if they were bred to be "guard dogs" (a lot of people tend to believe that the more aggressive a dog is the better it is as a guard dog). She
Dogs Who Mauled Virginia Woman: Sheriff Releases Details | PEOPLE.com Deputies watched dogs 'eating rib cage' of Virginia woman, 22, during mauling, sheriff says | Fox News. we have a vague reference to "an abusive home" which can mean a lot of things, including early imprinting and training for violence. The dogs were originally her house dogs, but somewhere along the line she took them to her father's and left them there. The dogs were relegated to being outside dogs with her visiting (apparently only for walks) 3 -4 times a week. That's a radical change in situation -- from pampered house pet to unwanted and underfed (per the article they were indeed underfed) yard dogs. There's a lot of things that could have triggered the dogs -- she could have done something as simple as trip over them or they may have started to fight between themselves and she tried to intervene. They may have then turned on her. Once stimulated to attack, she lost control of the dogs. That they then started eating her is indicative to me of much bigger problems underlying these dogs -- a lot of dogs will kill but not eat prey animals and they are even less likely to eat a "pack member" if given an option. You might read Scott & Fuller's books on genetic basis of dog behavior Genetics and the Social Behavior of the Dog, Scott, Fuller and https://books.google.com/books/about/Dog_Behavior.html?id=J1-otwAACAAJ - despite being written in the 1965 period, the study still is a landmark showing triggering thresholds and aggression thresholds.

While there is still speculation that something started it, so far there's no evidence of any outside issue. It may have been as simple as one of the dogs starting after a cat and objecting to her trying to stop it. There's no evidence, despite the assertion she was a "trainer" that she had actually trained these dogs to any particular level of obedience and compliance.
I not big specialist, but have some experience with aggressive dog breeds including dogs trained and bread for fights. Many dog lovers don't agree, but it seems that if dogs were truly bred for fighting or trained for fighting well they loose some important inhibitions, such as not fighting dogs of opposite sex, ignoring surrender signals etc. So, people that are not true specialists should avoid genuine fighting dogs as pets.

All discussed reasons makes sense only if dogs had something wrong with them, either abuse or successful breading for fights program. "Normal" dog should stop as soon as attacked member of pack show surrender, dogs that live with people understand people surrender pretty well.
 
Oct 2013
6,153
Planet Nine, Oregon
#36
If the dogs were abused previously, that makes sense. My mother had to have an abused rescue dog put to sleep; he seemed fine for a while, then asserted dominance and drew blood on my mother and father, we loved the dog, and it was very difficult. I'd love to get my hands on the *beeps* who abused him.
 
Jun 2012
7,121
Malaysia
#37
I not big specialist, but have some experience with aggressive dog breeds including dogs trained and bread for fights. Many dog lovers don't agree, but it seems that if dogs were truly bred for fighting or trained for fighting well they loose some important inhibitions, such as not fighting dogs of opposite sex, ignoring surrender signals etc.
In short, they gradually develop the ruthless single mindedness of a killer. Or a gladiator, if that sounds a bit better.

Either way, you can't do either of that too well, if you're still hampered by things like mercy, compassion, pity, gentleness, moderation etc. etc. etc.

In short again, you just hv to be completely, absolutely, utterly bad ass.

Moral of story: Don't be messin around with killer breeds. They're not child's play, by any means.
 
Jun 2012
7,121
Malaysia
#38
Even if the dog appears kind and gentle all it takes it was unfortunate day and that's it.
Like a bad hair day, so to speak.

Especially two of them, together there is no way an unarmed skinny woman who isn't trained how to kill dogs with bare hands is going to survive an attack by multiple pitbulls.
A former office colleague of mine once had a persistent dog following close on his heels. He pretended to just walk on, and then suddenly turned around and gave it a big kick in the face. The dog died. Probably hit him on the snout or something.

But it wasn't a killer breed, for sure.
 

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