What caused France to shift from being an eager Crusading power to being an Ottoman ally within a time period of several centuries?

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,936
SoCal
#1
What caused France to shift from being an eager Crusading power to being an Ottoman ally within a time period of several centuries? In the Middle Ages, France (even sometimes French Kings--and certainly some French nobles) eagerly participated in various Crusades to reconquer the Holy Land from the Muslims. However, in the 1500s and beyond, France appears to have become a steadfast Ottoman ally in spite of the fact that the Ottomans were Muslims and controlling the Holy Land. What exactly caused France's change in attitudes in regards to this?

The most obvious explanation to me seems that the spread of Hapsburg power caused France to conclude that the Hapburgs were a greater problem than the Ottomans were and thus make a deal with the Ottomans to ally against the Hapsburgs. However, were there any other factors that contributed to this change in French attitudes towards Muslim rule in the Holy Land?

Any thoughts on this?
 
Mar 2016
1,199
Australia
#4
The most obvious explanation to me seems that the spread of Hapsburg power caused France to conclude that the Hapburgs were a greater problem than the Ottomans were and thus make a deal with the Ottomans to ally against the Hapsburgs. However, were there any other factors that contributed to this change in French attitudes towards Muslim rule in the Holy Land?
Not really. It's not as if there was some newfound sense of cross-religious understanding or tolerance. The Turks/Muslims were viewed with just as much hostility and fear as they always had been, if not more so. The Franco-Ottoman alliance was purely a political one which was convenient to the rulers of their respective states in that specific situation, although Francis and Suleiman did have a personal correspondence that was very friendly and sympathetic; Suleiman wrote to Francis to comfort him while the French king was a captive of Charles V in Spain, reassuring him that there was no dishonour in being captured. The two men admired each other's strength and power, and saw each other as equals not from a religious perspective but from a status one; only fellow kings/emperors were seen as being equal to each other and could talk to each other as equals.
 
Likes: Futurist

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,936
SoCal
#5
Not really. It's not as if there was some newfound sense of cross-religious understanding or tolerance. The Turks/Muslims were viewed with just as much hostility and fear as they always had been, if not more so. The Franco-Ottoman alliance was purely a political one which was convenient to the rulers of their respective states in that specific situation, although Francis and Suleiman did have a personal correspondence that was very friendly and sympathetic; Suleiman wrote to Francis to comfort him while the French king was a captive of Charles V in Spain, reassuring him that there was no dishonour in being captured. The two men admired each other's strength and power, and saw each other as equals not from a religious perspective but from a status one; only fellow kings/emperors were seen as being equal to each other and could talk to each other as equals.
Very interesting! Thanks for explaining this!

BTW, did the Crusaders ever attempt to establish good relations with the Turks after 1204?
 

Maki

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
3,068
Republika Srpska
#7
Very interesting! Thanks for explaining this!

BTW, did the Crusaders ever attempt to establish good relations with the Turks after 1204?
The Crusaders did conclude agreements with the Muslims. For example it is probable that some sort of contact between the Crusaders and the Fatimids existed during the First Crusade. In 1108 Crusader Antioch was allied with Muslim Aleppo. Muslim ruler of Damascus, Toghtekin was allied with king Baldwin I of Jerusalem in 1115. In the 1140s Crusader Jerusalem was in an alliance with Muslim Damascus in order to oppose the Zengids. There are not the only examples. Of course, any alliance with the "heathens" was viewed as controversial. Sometimes the Crusaders justified them by citing their low numbers and claiming that such alliances were neccessary for the survival of Crusader states.
 
Likes: Futurist

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,489
Spain
#8
Well.. I can answer but I just don´t do it.. simply...don´t read historian but only contemporanean sources.... what people thought about Frenchmen in 16th century? That´s the reason because they supported Islam
 

martin76

Ad Honorem
Dec 2014
6,489
Spain
#10

Very interesting question... What´s to be a Turk? I found turks in Central Asia... and I know Dervishes named British Soldiers as "turks"....I´ve read some Huns....were turks!!!! or Bulgarian... or Ottomans.. or Seldjucids.. or Kiu Kiu....

A good question... Who are the Turks?
 

Similar History Discussions