What caused the extinction of the Prussian people?

Jul 2012
750
Australia
#41
In the first wave of migrations the Teutons brought in settlers from the West, mainly from Germany. Later, Poles were a significant settler group into Prussia - may help to explain the corridor of ethnic Poles from the current Polish north east border towards Vilnius.

An interesting article just after the end of ww2 on the fate of Prussia:
https://news.google.com/newspapers?...AIBAJ&sjid=j5QMAAAAIBAJ&pg=3613,6523618&hl=en
 
Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#42
Teutons were responsible for the demise of Baltic Prussian culture and language. Genes of Prussians exist among western Lithuanians living on the left bank of Nemanus. Prussians is first and foremost their language and culture. So Lithuanians Latvians are right about Prussians are being extinct now.
 

beorna

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
17,473
-
#43
One should as well not forget the plague epedemies, around 1400, im 1549, especially the plaques in the 17th century with the so-called great plague, which led to a re-population by germans and Poles. The Prussians could not call for Prussians from abroad, so that they weren't able to replace losses.
 
Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#44
In the first wave of migrations the Teutons brought in settlers from the West, mainly from Germany. Later, Poles were a significant settler group into Prussia - may help to explain the corridor of ethnic Poles from the current Polish north east border towards Vilnius.

An interesting article just after the end of ww2 on the fate of Prussia:
https://news.google.com/newspapers?...AIBAJ&sjid=j5QMAAAAIBAJ&pg=3613,6523618&hl=en
Poles on original Baltic speaking Prussian territory were Masurians. They were not significant in numbers.
 
Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#45
After world war II ended all Lutherans were sent in Germany For some reason Lutheran Poles (Masurians), Lithuanians (Lietuvininkai) and Latvians of eastern Prussia (Kursenieki) were considered Germans.
 
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Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#47
In 1708 were ca. 34% Prussians, 25% Germans, 21%Lithuanians and 19% masurians. Not really not significant.

There were no censuses in early 170f. Those are only estimates. Take a look at the number of Masurians in early 1900s or after WWII ended.
 
Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#49
The masurians declined as linguistic group. They adopted the German language. They nevertheless remained Masurians.
Masurians spoke Polish while being Lutherans till WWII ended. They actively resisted Germanisation identifying themselves as Masurians. Many were probably bilingual. Census figures are more accurate than someone's estimates of early 18th century.
 
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beorna

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
17,473
-
#50
Masurians spoke Polish while being Lutherans till WWII ended. They actively resisted Germanisation identifying themselves as Masurians. Many were probably bilingual. Census figures are more accurate than someone's estimates of early 18th century.
Only a few used masurian till the end of WWII. The masurian language declined since the end of the 19th century. In the 20th century most of them used German, even if the older were still able to speak masurian. My ancestors e.g had in the first half of the 19th century still their Polish name Wionczek. In the end of the 19th century they changed it into Jonczek/Jonzek.