What caused the extinction of the Prussian people?

Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#51
Only a few used masurian till the end of WWII. The masurian language declined since the end of the 19th century. In the 20th century most of them used German, even if the older were still able to speak masurian. My ancestors e.g had in the first half of the 19th century still their Polish name Wionczek. In the end of the 19th century they changed it into Jonczek/Jonzek.
There were around 300,000 Masurians in the first half 20th century. Masurian was a term applied to a group of people who spoke Lechitic (Polish) Slavic language. People identified themselves Masurians rather than Poles because they were Lutheran unlike Roman Catholic Poles.
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The Masurians or Mazurs (Polish: Mazurzy, German: Masuren) were a Lechitic sub-ethnic group in the present-day Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, Poland. They were descended from Masovians (Polish: Mazowszanie; German: Masowier), Polish settlers from Masovia who moved to Prussia during and after the Protestant Reformation, and who were primarily Lutheran.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masurians
 

beorna

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
17,473
-
#52
There were around 300,000 Masurians in the first half 20th century. Masurian was a term applied to a group of people who spoke Lechitic (Polish) Slavic language. People identified themselves Masurians rather than Poles because they were Lutheran unlike Roman Catholic Poles.
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The Masurians or Mazurs (Polish: Mazurzy, German: Masuren) were a Lechitic sub-ethnic group in the present-day Warmian-Masurian Voivodeship, Poland. They were descended from Masovians (Polish: Mazowszanie; German: Masowier), Polish settlers from Masovia who moved to Prussia during and after the Protestant Reformation, and who were primarily Lutheran.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masurians
In the 20th century they saw themselves as Germans of Masurian language or Germans with masurian/Polish heritage.
 
Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#53
In the 20th century they saw themselves as Germans of Masurian language or Germans with masurian/Polish heritage.

They didn't see themselves as Germans during 20th century. They continued speaking Lechitic and they were identified as Poles. The reason they were deported to Germany after WWII ended because Masurians were Lutheran supporting Nazi German party during 30s.

PS
Find an article on Masurians and don't be an ill-informed such as an American.
 
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beorna

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
17,473
-
#54
They didn't see themselves as Germans during 20th century. They continued speaking Lechitic and they were identified as Poles. The reason they were deported to Germany after WWII ended because Masurians were Lutheran supporting Nazi German party during 30s.

PS
Find an article on Masurians and don't be an ill-informed such as an American.
Only a few did use the masurian language in the end of WWII. In the plebiscite of 1920 98% voted for Germany and the NSDAP got there more than 50%. As I said, some of my ancestors were masurians and they did feel German.

Masurians weren't deported after WWII, if they could speak masurian. They were allowed to remain as autochthonous or even forced to stay. The majority left, if they were allowed to leave after 1956
 
Nov 2014
1,933
Cyberspace
#55
Only a few did use the masurian language in the end of WWII. In the plebiscite of 1920 98% voted for Germany and the NSDAP got there more than 50%. As I said, some of my ancestors were masurians and they did feel German.

Masurians weren't deported after WWII, if they could speak masurian. They were allowed to remain as autochthonous or even forced to stay. The majority left, if they were allowed to leave after 1956

There's not such thing as a Masurian language. Masurians spoke Polish. Masurians were deported from eastern Prussia en-masses after WWII. Few remaining Masurians emigrated in the 50s.
 

beorna

Ad Honoris
Jan 2010
17,473
-
#56
There's not such thing as a Masurian language. Masurians spoke Polish. Masurians were deported from eastern Prussia en-masses after WWII. Few remaining Masurians emigrated in the 50s.
Masurian is disputed. But I agree, that it is based on Polish or a Masowian dialect. But it adopted lots of German words. It is a bit like Dutch. Some classify it as own language, some as Low-German dialect.
About 160.000 masurians remained in Masuria after the expulsion. Since 1989 alone, about 55.000 arrived. The Masurian minority in Poland today has about 30.000 people iirc.
 
Jul 2014
3
USA
#58
The evisceration of Prussia by Russia, expelling all natives, destroying German heritage and architecture and letting agriculture erode. In 1947 Prussia was expunged by the victorious Allies and German history was subsumed as Russian heritage and culture.