What Countries Still Wear Traditional Clothes

Sep 2015
479
Pakistan
That's a highly inaccurate assertion to make. The Indian subcontinent has perhaps the longest history of cotton cultivation in the world and people in the region have long used it for garments and clothing. Silks, linens, and so on were likewise used long before the introduction of Islam to that part of the world. Styles and amounts of clothing may have differed between regions as dictated by climate but to say that "Hindus were barely clothed before the advent of Islam" is more a reflection of your prejudices than of reality.
Not India but oldest cultivation of cotton origins lies in Pakistan IVC, please verify your sources before writing anything.
 
Aug 2017
210
USA
Not India but oldest cultivation of cotton origins lies in Pakistan IVC, please verify your sources before writing anything.
I said the Indian subcontinent, which by definition includes the present day countries of Pakistan and India. My statement was perfectly accurate, especially since the IVC was spread throughout present day Pakistan and North Western India.
 
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Sep 2015
479
Pakistan
I said the Indian subcontinent, which by definition includes the present day countries of Pakistan and India. My statement was perfectly accurate, especially since the IVC was spread throughout present day Pakistan and North Western India.
Remember we don't tolerate RSS/Hindutva agenda here where gangu telis sitting beside Ganges claim history from Afghanistan up to Sri Lanka as their own.
 
Aug 2017
210
USA
Remember we don't tolerate RSS/Hindutva agenda here where gangu telis sitting beside Ganges claim history from Afghanistan up to Sri Lanka as their own.
I'm not sure where this is coming from. I'm merely saying that the subcontinent, which includes the present day countries of Pakistan and India, has a long history of clothing derived from its cultivation of cotton and production of other materials prior to the advent of Islam.
 
Sep 2015
479
Pakistan
I'm not sure where this is coming from. I'm merely saying that the subcontinent, which includes the present day countries of Pakistan and India, has a long history of clothing derived from its cultivation of cotton and production of other materials prior to the advent of Islam.
You do realize south asia is bigger then europe? What you are doing is claiming our history which isn't tolerated here. We don't need RSS version of history here. India had nothing to do with cotton cultivation, Azad is absolutly right.
 
Sep 2015
479
Pakistan
We can see exemple of isolated Indian tribe cloths, I don't see any cotton but animal skin and plants to cover if at all. Which mean it was introduced much later from Pakistan/IVC to India.
 
Aug 2017
210
USA
You do realize south asia is bigger then europe? What you are doing is claiming our history which isn't tolerated here. We don't need RSS version of history here. India had nothing to do with cotton cultivation, Azad is absolutly right.
I'm not sure where this notion of "claiming our history" is coming from. The oldest example of cotton cultivation is indeed in the IVC, which is the shared heritage of the people of present day India and Pakistan.

If it makes you happy to claim the entirety of the IVC for present-day Pakistan, then fine. I still don't see what relevance it has since cotton production became widespread throughout Ancient India (even as far as South India) millennia before introduction of Islam and regardless of its specific origin within the larger subcontinent. As an example, there are even reports from Megasthenes, the Greek ambassador to the Mauryan imperial court, attesting to cotton production in the Mauryan empire.

So no, Azad is certainly not "absolutely right".

I would also like to point out that both the cotton gin and spinning wheel were invented in "India" prior to the introduction of Islam and both of these technologies point to the large scale production of cotton and clothing in that region of the world. So yet again, it is absurd to claim that "Hindus were barely clothed".
 
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Nov 2016
1,531
Indus Valley, Pakistan
I'm not sure where this notion of "claiming our history" is coming from. The oldest example of cotton cultivation is indeed in the IVC, which is the shared heritage of the people of present day India and Pakistan.

If it makes you happy to claim the entirety of the IVC for present-day Pakistan, then fine. I still don't see what relevance it has since cotton production became widespread throughout Ancient India (even as far as South India) millennia before introduction of Islam and regardless of its specific origin within the larger subcontinent. As an example, there are even reports from Megasthenes, the Greek ambassador to the Mauryan imperial court, attesting to cotton production in the Mauryan empire.

So no, Azad is certainly not "absolutely right".

I would also like to point out that both the cotton gin and spinning wheel were invented in "India" prior to the introduction of Islam and both of these technologies point to the large scale production of cotton and clothing in that region of the world. So yet again, it is absurd to claim that "Hindus were barely clothed".
While you have valid point about the Indian sub continent but might I suggest it might be more appropriate to use the term "South Asia" with referance to the geographic sub-continent and reserve the term "India" for the modern political entity. This would avoid confusion and prevent any ambigiuty about what exactly we are talking about.

And the IVC indeed did have a spread from Afghanistan, into Pakistan and over into India. This is similar perhaps to how the civilization on the Nile was spread from the mouth of the Nile all the way south to the Ethopian Highlands and even possibly Eritrea. However it would be true to say that Egypt was the fulcrum of that civilization insofar as Indus had it's fulcrum in what is now Pakistan.







This can be seen in the map below. The Indus River is 94% in Pakistan with few % points being in India and the source being in China. Indus River is well distal to majority of India. The Indian population is mostly placed in the Ganga River Basin and South of India.







The use of the term South Asia might also cause less consternation between Indian and Pakistani members enabling a more conciliatory tone around here that helps discussion. Surely a good thing all around.
 
Aug 2017
210
USA
While you have valid point about the Indian sub continent but might I suggest it might be more appropriate to use the term "South Asia" with referance to the geographic sub-continent and reserve the term "India" for the modern political entity. This would avoid confusion and prevent any ambigiuty about what exactly we are talking about.

And the IVC indeed did have a spread from Afghanistan, into Pakistan and over into India. This is similar perhaps to how the civilization on the Nile was spread from the mouth of the Nile all the way south to the Ethopian Highlands and even possibly Eritrea. However it would be true to say that Egypt was the fulcrum of that civilization insofar as Indus had it's fulcrum in what is now Pakistan.







This can be seen in the map below. The Indus River is 94% in Pakistan with few % points being in India and the source being in China. Indus River is well distal to majority of India. The Indian population is mostly placed in the Ganga River Basin and South of India.







The use of the term South Asia might also cause less consternation between Indian and Pakistani members enabling a more conciliatory tone around here that helps discussion. Surely a good thing all around.
I understand your point, but I tend to use the terms South Asia, Indian subcontinent, and "the subcontinent" interchangeably. All of these are widely used in and outside of academia. If there are those who take offense to those words, the burden is on them to recognize that these are merely convenient labels and that there is no agenda intended behind any of them.
 
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