What Countries Still Wear Traditional Clothes

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,648
New Delhi, India
#51
Remember we don't tolerate RSS/Hindutva agenda here where gangu telis sitting beside Ganges claim history from Afghanistan up to Sri Lanka as their own.
For your information, RSS and the current ruling party, Bharatiya Janata Party, have no problem with Pakistan (other than Pakistan's support for terrorism. That is a useless idea and is never going to succeed against India. It is harming Pakistan more than India. It also harms the Indian Muslims). The idea is Greater India (Akhand Bharat) belongs to Hindu Mahasabha, which is a very small organization in India. I do not think it has won even one set in the Indian parliament or in any state legislature.
 
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Sep 2015
479
Pakistan
#52
For your information, RSS and the current ruling party, Bharatiya Janata Party, have no problem with Pakistan (other than Pakistan's support for terrorism. That is a useless idea and is never going to succeed against India. It is harming Pakistan more than India. It also harms the Indian Muslims). The idea is Greater India (Akhand Bharat) belongs to Hindu Mahasabha, which is a very small organization in India. I do not think it has won even one set in the Indian parliament or in any state legislature.
We also don't have problem with RSS apart from their proxy terrorists in Pakistan. Right now leader of right wing Hindutva is PM of India so I'm well aware of what is going on there.
 

Comet

Forum Staff
Aug 2006
8,702
IA
#54
Shaddap child of britian.

Ghanddu Maadharchod
I want you all to take a real hard look at how long these two are suspended. The Asian forum is becoming a major problem. Here is how to fix it...

A. Check your damn nationalistic ideology at the door. Be flexible to people's ideas.
B. If you are frustrated with a conversation, leave for a while and come back later when cooled off.

Any more issues could result in much longer suspensions. It is real simple...BE RESPECTFUL.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,648
New Delhi, India
#55
Right now leader of right wing Hindutva is PM of India so I'm well aware of what is going on there.
Yeah, right now the anti-Hindu and dynastic Congress Party is being decimated and BJP, the party which favors equal rights for all is winning. Muslims are turning over to BJP. Initial news report mention that 25 Muslim candidates have been put up by BJP for the Municipal Polls in UP. In the coming Gujarat Polls (result on Nov. 18), a lot many Muslims will be voting for BJP. But all this does not relate to OP.
 
Jul 2014
1,602
world
#56
Oh dear .... what do we have here ?

Afghans wear the dress of their Central Asian conquerors and so do many Indians/ Pakistanis. Nothing shameful about it and there is nothing to be proud too.

India/Pakistan/Afghans had one of the greatest civilization on earth. The women wore beautiful clothes. now look at them. Women even the Hindu women are draped like a doll. Nothing sexy about them.

I wish the Women of the subcontinent will dress according to the medieval style not Islamic style ninja dresses. You guys have something real to be proud of. Why not copy your ancestors instead of some guy from some desert/island ?

Why follow the style of desert tribes or English Islanders when it is not suitable for the climate ?
 
Aug 2014
1,273
pakistan
#57
Stitched cloths were not available in pre-medieval India. Stitched tunics, robes and trousers were introduced to India during Sultanate period, and continued to gain popularity during Mughal period. People in Hindu kingdoms during medieval period, which were not occupied by Muslims, kept the ancient mode of clothing i.e covering themselves with a single cloth with exposed upper body e.g in Vijaynagra empire.
 

Aupmanyav

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,648
New Delhi, India
#58
You have not worn a men's dhoti (Mundu in South India), but I am sure you are familiar with lungi (Veshti in South India). So comfortable. I would prefer them any day against the dresses from other cultures. As for women, nothing better than a saree. You can do all that you do wearing pant equally well while wearing dhoti or lungi. One does not need much upper wear in most of India other than a kurta and some times not even that, just an angavastram.
 
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Feb 2011
1,018
#59
I think you are exaggerating the PRC ethnic classification's prevalence in the grass root level of society and also underestimates it's flexibility. The concept of "Han Chinese" itself is very restricted to the intellectual circle.The average Chinese with no intellectual interest have very little identification with the term and simply treats all ethnic groups of China as one race
I would tend to disagree. While "nationalities" as they exist in China today are a relatively recent construct, they also are a very pervasive one - appearing in identity cards, media reports, and perhaps most relevant to the future, commonly on the Chinese internet. Even a cursory search of websites like Baidu Baikie and Tieba can tell you that. The majority group of a country is always relatively less aware of its own identity than minorities, but the presence of minorities inevitably reinforce the majority's own sense of identity, over time. Unless China moves to eliminate ethnic differences altogether, I doubt identity politics will decrease or disappear from Chinese society.

And even with formal PRC ethnic concepts applied, it's not quite as untenable as you think, because not all ethnic groups have their unique clothing and one can easily play with terms to remove any particular ethnic labels on to these clothings. Modified Magua for example is given the name Tang Zhuang just so it appears Chinese without any ethnic connotation. If there is a clothing representing a supra ethnic Chinese nationality the Magua based Tang Zhuang will be it and the PRC supports that. Clothing between Manchu and Han are shared, and in many cases it is hard to draw a clear line between their popular culture because of centuries of intermingling.

People can revive Han clothing all they want, but it would be ridiculous to say that Qipao and Magua aren't Chinese national clothings, thats the point and I doubt most people will say they aren't, even the Chinese government.
The problem with this argument is that you're assuming the Chinese population will maintain or decrease their awareness of the history of Manchu and Han clothing, over time. Yet the opposite is more likely: in an age ruled by social media, ideas spread faster, not slower. Any Chinese who doesn't know the history of their country's fashion will likely become more familiar with it, not less, in the next few decades. So the question is not whether you can hide the difference, but whether you can convince the average Han Chinese that they shouldn't have any unique ethnic clothing that isn't copied from Manchu clothing. Presuming that China is a rising nation and its majority population are becoming more proud of themselves, and not less, over time, I find that hard to argue.
 
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Mar 2012
4,411
#60
I would tend to disagree. While "nationalities" as they exist in China today are a relatively recent construct, they also are a very pervasive one - appearing in identity cards, media reports, and perhaps most relevant to the future, commonly on the Chinese internet. Even a cursory search of websites like Baidu Baikie and Tieba can tell you that. The majority group of a country is always relatively less aware of its own identity than minorities, but the presence of minorities inevitably reinforce the majority's own sense of identity, over time. Unless China moves to eliminate ethnic differences altogether, I doubt identity politics will decrease or disappear from Chinese society.
Through personal research and encounters, I have to completely disagree with this statement. Let's not forget that the major national identity that's constructed by the PRC is Zhonghua minzu, not Hanzu or the other minorities. This construct has real affects on the psychology of the common masses.

Just because minzu identities exist on ID doesn't mean people view it the way that it was originally designed in the western sense of the word (and the government doesn't want it to be interpreted that way, and they are successful at it). Everyone knows there are ethnic minorities, but the term commonly understood by the Chinese populace is very different from the American idea of race or nation. The fact of the matter is, the average person in China (Han or minority, the major exceptions being less Sinisized groups like Uighurs and Tibetans, but even here, I've lived among them long enough to see many also follows the standard Chinese view) do not think ethnic minorities are different races and most even think that ethnic minority languages are another variety of Chinese just like Chinese dialects. The idea that most Han people think they are a race separate from the other minorities is an intellectual delusion; most Han don't think like that at all. I've done a survey particularly on the subject and asked minorities (including Manchus, Hui, Zhuang, Bai, and even some Mongols) what race they are, the first thing most of them answer is not the identity on their ID, it is Chinese. Chinese, not Han, is the national and yes, even racial identity. That is the popular view. It is Han minzu which is the bigger political fiction in today's reality, not Zhonghua minzu. The idea that ethnic minorities are not racially Chinese are restricted to a selected few intellectuals.



The problem with this argument is that you're assuming the Chinese population will maintain or decrease their awareness of the history of Manchu and Han clothing, over time. Yet the opposite is more likely: in an age ruled by social media, ideas spread faster, not slower. Any Chinese who doesn't know the history of their country's fashion will likely become more familiar with it, not less, in the next few decades. So the question is not whether you can hide the difference, but whether you can convince the average Han Chinese that they shouldn't have any unique ethnic clothing that isn't copied from Manchu clothing. Presuming that China is a rising nation and its majority population are becoming more proud of themselves, and not less, over time, I find that hard to argue.
And you are assuming that there is a one way evolution; all people will simply want to adopt Han clothing and relate to a Han identity. People might just as well promote Qipao and Magua as they have for over a century and modify it to become the traditional Chinese national clothing. It is supra-ethnic nationalism that is gaining stronger grounds in this new age among professional intellectuals and grass root non-intellectuals, not Han nationalism. You can easily see this through the numerous attempts by Chinese anthropologist, however ridiculous, at trying to trace Mongoloid DNA in the Uighur population to prove they are related to the Han. This is also the same force behind denouncing Yuefei as a national hero and why history schools like the New Qing History is attacked fiercely in China. Han nationalism is largely restricted to the realm of amateur historians. Zhonghua minzu, not Hanzu, is the greater historical force today and it is the only way China can move if it ever wants to incorporate it's minorities into its system.
 
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