What did the Germans plan to do with captured territory if they won WW1?

#1
What did the Germans plan to do with captured territory had they won ww1? I heard somewhere that they planned to make a puppet state out of the Russian part of Poland but I'm sceptical as surely they'd have realised that would revive Polish nationalism and hopes for an independent Poland thus compromising their control of the parts they and their Austro-Hungarian allies occupied. And what of France and Belgium? Had they won did they plan to annex any of that? Set up puppet governments? Or just demand reparations?
 

funakison

Ad Honorem
Oct 2012
5,381
Between a rock and a hard place
#2
As the war progressed and the body count and suffering grew, so the estimates of a suitable reward for that suffering grew. What the German public would have considered as a suitable reward for their sacrifice would have depnded on a number of factor.
Initialy the German chancellor drew up an ambitious plan call the septemberprogram which did indeed reduce Poland to a puppet state, whilst the same time siezing much of Frances coal and steel producing areas, anexing belgium and siezing some of the channel ports.
Within days of the plan being issued it was feeectively dead in the water as Germanys gamble on a speedy victory degenerated into trench warfare
 
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pugsville

Ad Honorem
Oct 2010
9,356
#3
What did the Germans plan to do with captured territory had they won ww1? I heard somewhere that they planned to make a puppet state out of the Russian part of Poland but I'm sceptical as surely they'd have realised that would revive Polish nationalism and hopes for an independent Poland thus compromising their control of the parts they and their Austro-Hungarian allies occupied. And what of France and Belgium? Had they won did they plan to annex any of that? Set up puppet governments? Or just demand reparations?
German diplomacy and geo-political thinking in general in tis period was hardly tinged with much in the way of realism. Clumsy, hamfisted, and never likely to work was the hallmark of German diplomacy. During the war their occupations put the native population 0ff side. It's hard to see the expanded German Empire being very stable.
 

kazeuma

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
2,366
#4
I would expect the colonial concessions in Africa and China would be changed though treaty. In a perfect world, the Germans would maybe put an end to the Belgium genocide of the natives of the Congo.
 

Nemowork

Ad Honorem
Jan 2011
8,445
South of the barcodes
#6
I would expect the colonial concessions in Africa and China would be changed though treaty. In a perfect world, the Germans would maybe put an end to the Belgium genocide of the natives of the Congo.
Given the well publicised German massacres in China, Belgium and Namibia how likely is that fantasy?
 

Larrey

Ad Honorem
Sep 2011
5,629
#7
I would expect the colonial concessions in Africa and China would be changed though treaty. In a perfect world, the Germans would maybe put an end to the Belgium genocide of the natives of the Congo.
The Congo Free State perpetrated that. It was a recognized sovereign state. Internationally the groundwork was lai for it at the Berlin Congress of 1884. Belgiums involvement might be said to be the vote in parliament confirming that Leopold would be the sovereign monarch over this new entity. (Leopold asked once, and then never again.)

And when the lid was blown on what the Free State had been up to, the international powers of the day dismantled it in response. It was abolished in 1908, so six years before the outbreak WWI. Only then was the territory, and its people, handed to Belgium to run as a straight-up colony. As such it didn't differ from other colonial regimes, but the genocidal profit-making stopped. The Belgians invested in mining operations to turn a profit instead, not Leopold's and his crew's get-rich-quick by murder and mutilation scheme.
 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,811
Sydney
#8
.
It took a while for war aims to be formulated ,it seems that the subject had not been really though out , also it changed as the war progressed but essentially it contained the following elements
territory in Belgium , protectorate over the Netherlands , a further cut of France , including the Iron mines of Lorraine ,the fortress of Belfort , the port of Dunkirk and Calais ,
in the East annexation of Russia's polish territory and Lithuania , a protectorate over Latvia , Estonia and Finland
the establishment of an Ukrainian republic beholden to the Prussian Empire

In short pretty much the program of the European commission
 
Oct 2013
6,420
Planet Nine, Oregon
#10
What did the Germans plan to do with captured territory had they won ww1? I heard somewhere that they planned to make a puppet state out of the Russian part of Poland but I'm sceptical as surely they'd have realised that would revive Polish nationalism and hopes for an independent Poland thus compromising their control of the parts they and their Austro-Hungarian allies occupied. And what of France and Belgium? Had they won did they plan to annex any of that? Set up puppet governments? Or just demand reparations?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generalplan_Ost#Phases_of_the_plan_and_its_implementation

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Order_(Nazism)

Plans in Africa:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Order_(Nazism)#Plans_for_an_African_colonial_domain

"The remaining southern sector would be controlled by a pro-Nazi Afrikaner state built on racial grounds.[47] In early 1940 Foreign Minister Ribbentrop had communicated with South African leaders thought to be sympathetic to the Nazi cause, informing them that Germany was to reclaim its former colony of German South-West Africa, then a mandate of the Union of South Africa.[48] South Africa was to be compensated by the territorial acquisitions of the British protectorates of Swaziland, Basutoland and Bechuanaland and the colony of Southern Rhodesia.[48] On the division of French African colonies between the Spanish and Italian governments Hitler refused to provide any official promises during the war, however, fearful of losing the support of Vichy France."
 
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