What happened if someone could not produce an Aryan certificate during the Third Reich?

Jul 2019
1
Scotland, UK
#1
Hi all,

I finished reading Eric Ehrenreich's "The Nazi Ancestral Proof: Genealogy, Racial Science, and the Final Solution" and came across some important information:

On assuming power in 1933, the Nazi regime rapidly and thoroughly institutionalized this racial scientific ideology, with virtually no opposition from either individuals or institutions. Why? To answer this question, the present study analyzes two related historical phenomena. One is institutionalized genealogical practice in Imperial Germany (1871-1918) and the Weimar Republic (1919-1933).'While seemingly innocuous, genealogical practice in these periods formed the backbone of the second focus of this study, the Nazi-era “ancestral proof [Abstammungsnachweis]” or “Aryan proof [Ariernachweis].” This was the method of proving “racial acceptability” in the Third Reich for the purposes of the multiplicity of racial laws implemented between 1933 and 1945. During those twelve years, the vast majority of the German population probably made such a proof.
p. 10

By 1943, a commentator on the Nazi eugenic laws confirmed that “there is scarcely a German today who will not be required to obtain the proof of his ancestry at least once in life.” It is probably not an overstatement to say that by 1945, aside from the very old and the very young, virtually every Reich citizen, or would-be citizen, had made an ancestral proof at one time or another.
p. 61

What happened to those Germans who could not provide evidence that their four grandparents were of "German or related blood"?
 

Chlodio

Ad Honorem
Aug 2016
3,934
Dispargum
#2
It depends on why they were asked to provide that evidence. It was legal for employers to insist all employees were of "German or related blood." So if an applicant could not prove his ancestry, he might not be hired. Getting a marriage license may have required proof of German blood. It may have been possible to live without proving one's German blood, but it would have been difficult. Given that German blood was required for citizenship, then any right, privilege, or benefit that the government could bestow on a person could be denied without proof of German blood. Theoretically, driver's licenses, business licenses, any kind of permit, could be denied without proof of German blood. If accused of being Jewish, the easiest way to establish one's innocence was to have a certificate of German blood.
 
Jul 2016
9,327
USA
#3
What happened to those Germans who could not provide evidence that their four grandparents were of "German or related blood"?
It meant, according to German Nuremberg racial laws and later changes/modifications, legal or extrajudicial, that they weren't German citizens. And thus their property, jobs, and lives were in jeopardy. Maybe nothing happens, maybe they end up in a concentration camp.
 

Isleifson

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,870
Lorraine tudesque
#4
There were two certificate. The big one and the small one.

The small one was going back to 1800 and the big one to 1750.

Small one was needed to be a civil servant, to join the Wehrmacht.

Big one to join the SS.

All this changed after 1942.
 
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Chlodio

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Aug 2016
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#5
Something else just occurred to me. Jews were denied citizenship rights. One thing you can't get without citizenship is a passport. Without a passport you can't enter most countries. This made it difficult for Jews to emigrate out of Germany. I heard one story of a Jewish family that went to China because that was one of the few countries that did not have border controls in place at that time. You could literally walk off of the boat and enter China. No one would stop you. But Jews trying to go anywhere else needed a passport and you couldn't get one without citizenship which you couldn't get without an Aryan certificate.
 
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Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
18,742
SoCal
#6
Something else just occurred to me. Jews were denied citizenship rights. One thing you can't get without citizenship is a passport. Without a passport you can't enter most countries. This made it difficult for Jews to emigrate out of Germany. I heard one story of a Jewish family that went to China because that was one of the few countries that did not have border controls in place at that time. You could literally walk off of the boat and enter China. No one would stop you. But Jews trying to go anywhere else needed a passport and you couldn't get one without citizenship which you couldn't get without an Aryan certificate.
So, how did a couple hundred thousand Jews manage to emigrate from Germany between 1933 and 1941?
 

Chlodio

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Aug 2016
3,934
Dispargum
#7
So, how did a couple hundred thousand Jews manage to emigrate from Germany between 1933 and 1941?
The citizenship laws only took effect in 1935 and '36. 100,000 Jews left Germany already in 1933. Other Jews could have had passports from before the new Nazi laws took effect. In Europe, where the countries are smaller and closer together, it is/was more common for people to have passports than in modern day America where most people do not have a passport. Some Jews may have had dual citizenship and got passports from their other countries. Then there is illegal immigration. It adds up. Before you know it 300,000 Jews have left Germany and another 100,000 left Austria. The actor John Banner, most famous for playing Sergeant Schultz on Hogan's Heroes, was an Austrian Jew who was performing in Switzerland at the time of the Anschluss. He had his passport with him and never went back to Austria until after the war.
 
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Chlodio

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Aug 2016
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#9
The Nazis set up system of paying various fees and charges, that made Jewish immigration a way for the Reich to acquire foreign currency. Jewish immigration was possible with money.
The Nazi government could work at cross purposes that way. 'We hate Jews, but we won't let them emigrate' or 'We hate Jews but we'll take their money.'
 
Mar 2019
1,252
Kansas
#10
The Nazis set up system of paying various fees and charges, that made Jewish immigration a way for the Reich to acquire foreign currency. Jewish immigration was possible with money.
You did have to pay a years worth of income tax in advance before you could leave. There was some pretty stiff requirements on assets as well, but I dont recall those of the top of my head.