What happened to the Byzantine nobility after the fall of Constantinople in 1453?

Kirialax

Ad Honorem
Dec 2009
4,814
Blachernai
#13
How do you differentiate between travelling from somewhere and travelling to somewhere on this map? In other words, differentiating between the starting destination and the ending destination.
For that you need to go into the data. The idea with these sorts of network maps is to do the sorts of math that belong to network theory to figure out zones of connection and whatnot that might not be visible in a standard prosopographical study.
 

Futurist

Ad Honoris
May 2014
19,746
SoCal
#14
For that you need to go into the data. The idea with these sorts of network maps is to do the sorts of math that belong to network theory to figure out zones of connection and whatnot that might not be visible in a standard prosopographical study.
I need some help in deciphering this data, please. For instance, here is the map:

https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/v...E&ll=45.77516913358641,14.088082528474843&z=6

And here is the data for one of the stars/points on this map:

"Thessalonike

Name
Thessalonike
Betweenness
0.08646198
Degree
433
Latitude
40.647222
Longitude
22.963889
Newman
1"

I know that name, latitude, and longitude are, but not the other factors.
 
Dec 2009
4,814
Blachernai
#15
I know that name, latitude, and longitude are, but not the other factors.
Betweeness and Newman value are the relevant network analysis factors. I'm not a network analysis person and so any answer you get from me will probably be rather deficient. Why don't you ask Preiser-Kapeller himself via Facebook or Twitter? He's active on both, and very friendly and helpful.
 
Likes: Futurist
May 2014
19,746
SoCal
#16
Betweeness and Newman value are the relevant network analysis factors. I'm not a network analysis person and so any answer you get from me will probably be rather deficient. Why don't you ask Preiser-Kapeller himself via Facebook or Twitter? He's active on both, and very friendly and helpful.
That seems like a good idea; thanks! :)