What has happened to the tomb/monument of Hannibal Barca in Libyssa? Why did it disappear after the eleventh century?

Jul 2014
654
Messinia
#1
It is said that the Roman emperor Septimius Severus, himself a descendent of Phoenician colonists in North Africa, adorned Hannibal’s tomb with fine marble and erected a monument. His monument was in Libyssa where he died.

From Livius.org:

The place where this happened, Libyssa, was venerated by later generations. Among the pilgrims were Romans; the monument erected by the emperor Septimius Severus (193-211) was still visible in the eleventh century.

What happened to the monument and tomb of Hannibal? Is is still possible to find Hannibal’s tomb now? Was he likely cremated, as per Hellenistic customs?

Thank you.
 
Jan 2014
1,717
Portugal
#2
Found several reports, one about a modern tomb, built by Ataturk. Other about Hanibal ashes being spread in Malta.
As the original one, I found nothing...
 
Jan 2015
2,933
MD, USA
#3
Tombs and other old buildings are excellent sources of building material for successive generations. They may also occupy prime real estate that someone wants to build on. If all those nice tombs survived intact, there wouldn't be any space left for the living... Be happy we have historical accounts of Hannibal and other past heroes! Not all the great people from history have survived in that way.

Matthew
 
#4
It is said that the Roman emperor Septimius Severus, himself a descendent of Phoenician colonists in North Africa, adorned Hannibal’s tomb with fine marble and erected a monument. His monument was in Libyssa where he died.

From Livius.org:

The place where this happened, Libyssa, was venerated by later generations. Among the pilgrims were Romans; the monument erected by the emperor Septimius Severus (193-211) was still visible in the eleventh century.

What happened to the monument and tomb of Hannibal? Is is still possible to find Hannibal’s tomb now? Was he likely cremated, as per Hellenistic customs?

Thank you.
Unfortunately it probably became building material. But it certainly is interesting that Severus honoured the tomb. It probably says something about how African-born Romans, like Severus, constructed a relationship between themselves and a Punic past.
 

Similar History Discussions