What historical era was way different from what most people think?

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
24,957
Lago Maggiore, Italy
#11
Also in this we have seen a kind of evolution from when the common people simply ignored history [when education was rare and people simply heard to what this or that "authority" said ... like when in a church a priest told medieval tales about the life of a saint] to when the common people know what Hollywood diffuses!

This is the main problem: as it's obvious, common people don't read academic works, they watch movies and TV. Today with specialized TV channels like History Channel we are discoverying that aliens were on this planet in the far past [!!!] just to build pyramids and draw the Nazca lines ... and that Templars put a great treasure somewhere underground on Oak Island ... unfortunately under the level of the sea [again !!!].
 
Oct 2014
77
Osaka
#12
Also in this we have seen a kind of evolution from when the common people simply ignored history [when education was rare and people simply heard to what this or that "authority" said ... like when in a church a priest told medieval tales about the life of a saint] to when the common people know what Hollywood diffuses!

This is the main problem: as it's obvious, common people don't read academic works, they watch movies and TV. Today with specialized TV channels like History Channel we are discoverying that aliens were on this planet in the far past [!!!] just to build pyramids and draw the Nazca lines ... and that Templars put a great treasure somewhere underground on Oak Island ... unfortunately under the level of the sea [again !!!].
 
Likes: Swamp Booger
Aug 2010
15,231
Welsh Marches
#13
Great points in this post.

I don't agree with Holland's implication that the modern world and morality comes from Christianity, but then why would I? Japan is not a historically Christian society.
I wasn't really posting that video on account of his positive argument, but for the begining in which he describes how he came to feel that the world of ancient Rome was so alien to him. In a European context, many people's moral assumptions are often more based on Christian ideas than they often realize, I think he is right to that extent.
 

AlpinLuke

Ad Honoris
Oct 2011
24,957
Lago Maggiore, Italy
#14
Without the "Christian reform" the Roman Civitas would have kept on existing like it did through the Republic and then under the Empire. And sure without the fusion of the Empire with Christianity the so called "Western Civilization" would have known a quite different historical evolution.

It's anyway correct to underline that the Western Civilization [which has affected a large part of the world] is one of the civilizations which have leaded human history [we can list the Islamic Civilization, the Hindu Civilization, the Chinese Civilization ... and so on].

And here we can add an other point to this discussion:

how do we know the history of other civilizations?

To be clear: which is the level and the quality of knowledge of common Western People about Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Arab history?

We know a bit Arabs and Islam in general because our civilization has been competing with that civilization for centuries and centuries, but actually the common knowledge of Arab history is well poor in our countries.
 
Jan 2016
372
Ohio
#16
I too have to agree that the Medieval Ages is way different then we think. I myself was sold to this myth. I think it has alot to do with the term "Dark Age" being used in a negative connotation towards the Early Medieval Ages.

Afters studying art history, I came to realize how false this narrative was.

Manuscripts, Architecture (art that we live in), paintings, metal working. It was beautiful. Think Hagia Sophia (early medieval).

Slavery disappeared and more charities were introduced.

Mind you, some things were lost. Certain Roman building techniques (see the dome of the pantheon) got lost. I think this had a bit to do with times changing though. Correct me if I'm wrong but most tradesmen kept their secrets and only passed them to apprentices. So when the western roman empire fell and things were changing, its feasible that these techniques were lost as the need for these luxuries diminished and no-one seemed to worry about them. However, these were later re-discovered.
 
Last edited:
Likes: Rodger

Haakbus

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
3,578
United States
#17
Pre-Columbian and early post-Columbian America.

Not a bunch of peace-loving hippie communists. More like Neolithic cultures that were unique but altogether not that different from any other Neolithic culture, including the bad stuff (war, torture, rape, etc.). Every culture, history, and society has bloody stains.

Similar for the "Celtic" or any pre-Christian people in Europe.

This rampant noble savage notion is really annoying.
 
Last edited:
Mar 2019
19
Arizona
#18
Most people never think about history.

BUT World War Two is grossly misunderstood by almost all Americans.

Key points: the Soviet Union did 90% of the fighting and dying while the US did almost no fighting and dying against the Germans.

About 14,000 Germans died every day in the last twelve months of WW2.

The Germans routinely defeated (then withdrew) American and British troops in almost every tactical engagement in 44-45.

D-Day was a walkover and not the desperate battle depicted in movies.

The hardest fighting American troops in WW2 were the Marines. Every Pacific battlefield was a horror story.

Okinawa was a complete waste of American blood. By that time in 45, Japan was already smashed to pieces.

American easy prosperity in the 50s and 60s is almost purely attributable to the economic destruction of Europe and murder of European intelligentsia by the Nazis.

Very very few Americans actually saw combat although seven million served in uniform in WW2.
 
Mar 2016
560
Australia
#19
Most people never think about history.

BUT World War Two is grossly misunderstood by almost all Americans.

Key points: the Soviet Union did 90% of the fighting and dying while the US did almost no fighting and dying against the Germans.

About 14,000 Germans died every day in the last twelve months of WW2.

The Germans routinely defeated (then withdrew) American and British troops in almost every tactical engagement in 44-45.

D-Day was a walkover and not the desperate battle depicted in movies.

The hardest fighting American troops in WW2 were the Marines. Every Pacific battlefield was a horror story.

Okinawa was a complete waste of American blood. By that time in 45, Japan was already smashed to pieces.

American easy prosperity in the 50s and 60s is almost purely attributable to the economic destruction of Europe and murder of European intelligentsia by the Nazis.

Very very few Americans actually saw combat although seven million served in uniform in WW2.
You can dismiss the American contribution to the war if you want, but without them my country probably wouldn't exist, or would be a Japanese colony/puppet state. The US's two major contributions - both of which were game-changing - were in Lend Lease, as well as defeating the Japanese in the Pacific. The war was not won by beating Germans in a lot of battles.
 
Aug 2010
15,231
Welsh Marches
#20
Most people never think about history.

BUT World War Two is grossly misunderstood by almost all Americans.

Key points: the Soviet Union did 90% of the fighting and dying while the US did almost no fighting and dying against the Germans.

About 14,000 Germans died every day in the last twelve months of WW2.

The Germans routinely defeated (then withdrew) American and British troops in almost every tactical engagement in 44-45.

D-Day was a walkover and not the desperate battle depicted in movies.

The hardest fighting American troops in WW2 were the Marines. Every Pacific battlefield was a horror story.

Okinawa was a complete waste of American blood. By that time in 45, Japan was already smashed to pieces.

American easy prosperity in the 50s and 60s is almost purely attributable to the economic destruction of Europe and murder of European intelligentsia by the Nazis.

Very very few Americans actually saw combat although seven million served in uniform in WW2.
You criticize most people for never thinking about history and almost all Americans for misunderstanding WW2, and then prove the rule by going on to make a series of wholly unnuanced assertions, some not even half-truths. Not an impressive start here.