What historical era was way different from what most people think?

Sindane

Ad Honorem
Aug 2013
4,678
Europe
#22
Migration to the USA from Britain/Ireland c 1776 to 1900.

The impact of industrialisation on the British people 1775 to 1850.

Migration to Appalachia and also into the coal mining districts in the USA 1825 to 1900
 
Jan 2016
1,099
Victoria, Canada
#23
That's really interesting JeanDuke. I've never heard that perspective before. Can you suggest any further reading on this?
It's more of a common trend I've seen in many places throughout history than something I've seen in a specific book, but the Tides of History podcast (excellent in general, by the way, and produced by an accredited historian so more reliable than most podcasts) goes into quite a bit of depth on the subject in the context of late medieval and Early Modern Europe in its episodes on administration and peasant life.
 
Feb 2019
196
Thrace
#24
Maybe some people have a twisted perspective about the Middle Ages, but to say that the Church didn't actually impede intellectual progress is false. I've discovered that through my project to make a "smartest man in the world" chronology(don't mind the absurdness of this project :oops:). Just take a look at this Timeline of scientific discoveries - Wikipedia

There's a black hole between the 3rd and 9th century AD. And even after that, most intellectual progress was done in the Islamic/Indian/Chinese worlds. It was only until the renaissance when Europeans turned back to the teachings of Ancient philosophy that they had a major resurgence in scientific thought. It's absurd to defend Christians by saying they were the most learned European organisation in the Middle ages. They were dominating Europe, so everything(both bad and good) was done by them. But most of the intellectual progress was done in spite of Christianity(except art).
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,655
US
#25
Migration to the USA from Britain/Ireland c 1776 to 1900.

The impact of industrialisation on the British people 1775 to 1850.

Migration to Appalachia and also into the coal mining districts in the USA 1825 to 1900
Perhaps not one of the most misunderstood on a universal level, but for the (relatively) common American culture that was dominant for the first 200 years of America’s existence, yes.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,655
US
#26
Maybe some people have a twisted perspective about the Middle Ages, but to say that the Church didn't actually impede intellectual progress is false. I've discovered that through my project to make a "smartest man in the world" chronology(don't mind the absurdness of this project :oops:). Just take a look at this Timeline of scientific discoveries - Wikipedia

There's a black hole between the 3rd and 9th century AD. And even after that, most intellectual progress was done in the Islamic/Indian/Chinese worlds. It was only until the renaissance when Europeans turned back to the teachings of Ancient philosophy that they had a major resurgence in scientific thought. It's absurd to defend Christians by saying they were the most learned European organisation in the Middle ages. They were dominating Europe, so everything(both bad and good) was done by them. But most of the intellectual progress was done in spite of Christianity(except art).
For Europe, I disagree with your assessment. After all, who was impeded at a time when few were educated, let alone literate? And what of philosophers, mathematicians, and the development of science and scientific method by such men as Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, Duns Scotus and Robert Grosseteste during the High Middle Ages? These efforts were encapsulated by a movement toward Aristotelianism thought, especially empiricism.
 
Likes: WhatAnArtist
Feb 2019
196
Thrace
#27
For Europe, I disagree with your assessment. After all, who was impeded at a time when few were educated, let alone literate? And what of philosophers, mathematicians, and the development of science and scientific method by such men as Thomas Aquinas, Roger Bacon, Duns Scotus and Robert Grosseteste during the High Middle Ages? These efforts were encapsulated by a movement toward Aristotelianism thought, especially empiricism.
No one would be so foolish to claim there was 0 progress made. But we can observe a clear obstruction from Christianity.
 

Rodger

Ad Honorem
Jun 2014
5,655
US
#28
No one would be so foolish to claim there was 0 progress made. But we can observe a clear obstruction from Christianity.
You will have to cite some proof to convince me. I am sure there were a few taboos, but not anywhere near what is often portrayed. This is another fallacy. For example, human dissection for scientific purposes. When was the first secular university in Europe?
 
Feb 2019
196
Thrace
#29
You will have to cite some proof to convince me. I am sure there were a few taboos, but not anywhere near what is often portrayed. This is another fallacy. For example, human dissection for scientific purposes. When was the first secular university in Europe?
You named a handful of philosophers to prove that the middle ages actually had great philosophical progress? And incidentally all of them are from the 2nd millennium and bordering on the renaissance, when the intellectual resurgence was precisely because of the rediscovery of Antiquity. For centuries, European philosophy mostly consisted of mental gymnastic to lend the idea of God credence.
 
Feb 2019
196
Thrace
#30
Now it might come across that I meant those were the only notable philosophers for centuries, but I'd just take the L if someone thinks that philosophical progress was substantial during the middle ages. I find more insight in 3 guys from the same city in antiquity than in centuries put together from the early middle ages.