What historical period/event made you fall in love with history?

May 2011
13,683
Navan, Ireland
#41
Hey, don't blame the British for Cromwell, he was squarely English. The Welsh and Scots were loyal to the king and wanted nothing to do with that cretin.
It was a Civil war 'The' Welsh and 'The' Scots were on both sides as were 'The Irish' and 'The English'.

You must be very old if your grandfather took part in the Civil wars of the 17th century? why was he a Royalist?
 
Likes: bedb
Mar 2016
554
Australia
#42
It was a Civil war 'The' Welsh and 'The' Scots were on both sides as were 'The Irish' and 'The English'.
I'm not sure why you're obnoxiously putting quotation marks around the names of these peoples, as if they didn't exist or something. In the mid-17th century each of these regions of the British Isles absolutely were distinct enough in a variety of ways to warrant being referred to by their own names rather than a generic "British" tag.

You must be very old if your grandfather took part in the Civil wars of the 17th century? why was he a Royalist?
What on earth are you talking about?
 
May 2011
13,683
Navan, Ireland
#43
I'm not sure why you're obnoxiously putting quotation marks around the names of these peoples, as if they didn't exist or something. In the mid-17th century each of these regions of the British Isles absolutely were distinct enough in a variety of ways to warrant being referred to by their own names rather than a generic "British" tag.
I am putting speech marks around 'The Welsh' etc because there is no such thing as 'The' --one single entity, one opinion etc-- Cromwell was part of a series of Civil Wars that ripped across Britain and Ireland, its pretty much obvious that in a civil war countries are split, so Cromwell is not 'down to the English' but rather was one of the most effective leaders for Parliament against the Royalists and their allies.



What on earth are you talking about?
I suspect your grandfather was alive centuries after Cromwell was in Ireland.
 
Sep 2015
1,602
England
#44
Many things;-
Sunday afternoons as a child watching John Mills, Jack Hawkins and Richard Todd stopping the Nazi menace.

Airfix --- planes. Waterloo action set --- best Christmas present ever!

Zulu and The Man who would be King -- great movies
All classic films. Top of the pops and epic no less ! It seems like it was the The North-West Frontier that was on our TV screen on Sundays - for some reason ...? And the World at War series. Otherwise I promised myself i would read the coffee table/abridged Decline & Fall...one day. And eventually, eventually i did. was avid for a short while.
 
Sep 2015
1,602
England
#45
I'm not sure why you're obnoxiously putting quotation marks around the names of these peoples, as if they didn't exist or something. In the mid-17th century each of these regions of the British Isles absolutely were distinct enough in a variety of ways to warrant being referred to by their own names rather than a generic "British" tag.

What on earth are you talking about?
[If I may Kevin]

In reply to WhatAFartist: this is your idea of being sociable on a hobby discussion website.

If you really think Kevin's post was obnoxious, I would call your post, as above, acidic, turgid, idiotically insulting, bigoted and condescending.

I offer you the opportunity to withdraw your comments
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#46
Thankfully this kind of grudge bearing and 'Celtic blood' sillyness and myth making is on the wane from the descendants of the Irish diaspora in Australia and the USA

Pity we can't tell tone or expression here. I was being facetious. My grandfather was a fine , kind man. A policemen, there were two kinds of people he really disliked; wife beaters and con men.
 
Oct 2018
1,209
Adelaide south Australia
#47
Hey, don't blame the British for Cromwell, he was squarely English. The Welsh and Scots were loyal to the king and wanted nothing to do with that cretin.

Fair enough. I guess Cromwell should be hated on his own merits. The use of the word' British' was an unconscious habit of political correctness . Until quite recently, we said 'The English' when referring to some specially nasty piece of history originating in that fair land. :)
 
Jun 2018
124
Philadelphia, PA
#49
Borders. I began my brush with history by devling into the story of the New Jersey/New York (Amsterdam) border. It was the story of a very salient topic to me given where I was born and grew up. This was something that actually had a war fought over it for roughly half a century. It was the fact that something that seems so mundane today was actually built by people who would give their lives for it that drew me in and didn’t let go. The story of people and what they would do for something that abstract made me understand patriotism on a deeper level.
 
Jan 2019
198
Montreal, QC
#50
It wasn't so much the era itself, as it was the major actors of the era. My "discovery" of King Charles II (b. 1630, r. 1649/1660-1685) is what made me fall in love with history. He seems so much larger than life itself, and his story seems almost fantastical. To think that he was at first a prince, born to a king and queen who actually loved each other, only to be cast out into the war-ravaged Continent in over a decade of exile. The accounts of his court are as good as any tabloid, full of scandal, covert affairs, backstabbing, bastardry, and drunken excess. The extravagance of his court acted as a foil to the solemness of the man himself (yes, though he is remembered as the People's King and the Merry Monarch, Charles was, quite reasonably, traumatised by what he had experienced). Such a deep and passionate interest in him led me to his brother, James, Duke of York, later King James VII/II (b. 1633, r. 1685-89/1701). Stating it like that makes me sound like Barbara Villiers, but it's true. Before I fell in love with the era, I became enchanted with those two kings on a personal level. I've always hated how we are taught about historical figures. We keep them behind glass and on top of a pedestal, acting like they're nothing more than a cog in the machine that is history. We depersonalise them and view them as tools, and not as people.

Of course we need to understand their historical significance, but we cannot forget that they were living, breathing people with their own guilt, grief, merriment, and worries. I came to the Restoration era, then, by getting to "know" its two kings. I will be the first to admit that I am something of an apologist for James II, because I've done my research on him. The Whiggish accounts are as old as he is, and they're as biased as anything else. If we're to rely on over three centuries of material that has been very much against James for very little reason, when why are we even doing history? It's been a dream of mine for ages, now, to successfully reevaluate the reign of James II, and to present him in a different, but factually correct, light. If we can do the same for King John and King Richard III, then I think it'll be possible for James to get the same treatment.

TL;DR - Charles II and James II.
 

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