What if instead of bombing Pearl Harbor, Japan instead went for Russia?

Apr 2018
747
India
Tsuji was a mid-ranking intelligence officer. He was a nasty piece of work, but he was not responsible for the Japanese war plan.
He did the basic planning of Malaya. Later Yamashita made some adjustments (so says the link I shared above, don't know more than that). Which plan are you talking about? Overall?
 

Naomasa298

Forum Staff
Apr 2010
35,368
T'Republic of Yorkshire
He did the basic planning of Malaya. Later Yamashita made some adjustments (so says the link I shared above, don't know more than that). Which plan are you talking about? Overall?
Yes, the general Japanese war plan. He hardly deserves the epithet "warmongous rex". I don't know how much of his plan was used in the invasion of Malaya, but the article is wrong about the initial landings in Thailand. There was initial resistance, but within a day, the Thais had allied with the Japanese, not entirely out of coercion - Pibul Songkram saw it as a chance to regain further territories.

The article doesn't say he had anything to do with Pearl Harbor.
 
Apr 2018
747
India
Yes, the general Japanese war plan. He hardly deserves the epithet "warmongous rex". I don't know how much of his plan was used in the invasion of Malaya, but the article is wrong about the initial landings in Thailand. There was initial resistance, but within a day, the Thais had allied with the Japanese, not entirely out of coercion - Pibul Songkram saw it as a chance to regain further territories.

The article doesn't say he had anything to do with Pearl Harbor.
What I read everywhere (which is Wiki and a couple of pages) that he was just a 'fierce supporter' of the idea. IJN planners would never have included a guy like that in their planning.

Also I couldn't find what exact actions of his led to the escalation hostilities at Khalkhin Gol. Only the fact that he helped flare it up.

The article does treat him like some super genious which he was not remotely. But that is the only detailed source of information I found on the net.
 
Mar 2019
1,968
Kansas
Also I couldn't find what exact actions of his led to the escalation hostilities at Khalkhin Gol. Only the fact that he helped flare it up.
The Japanese had been nibbling away at Soviet territory for a while. It was when the Soviets felt the trans Siberian railway was in danger of being cut they decided to drop a world of hurt on the Japanese.
 
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holoow

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
3,851
Vilnius, Lithuania
You should need different outcome of Khalkhin Gol battle. Before this battle the army had always been the dominant branch over the navy and the navy's plan for attacking USA called nanshin-ron had no chance due to army being more important. It's basically internal fight/competition after money, invading the USSR would shift the budget to the Army, but attacking the United States would shift the budget to the navy. After Khalkhin Gol fiasco the hokushin-ron was literally destroyed and money went to the navy and their plan.
Khalkhin Gol was an insignificant battle between Soviet Union/Mongolia and Kwantung Army of Manchuko.
 

holoow

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
3,851
Vilnius, Lithuania
Molotov-Ribbentrop pact probably had more impact on Japanese decision not to fight the Soviets in 1939-1941 than clashes with Soviets in 1938/1939. And then Nizis attacked, it was too late for Japanese.
 
Apr 2018
747
India
Molotov-Ribbentrop pact probably had more impact on Japanese decision not to fight the Soviets in 1939-1941 than clashes with Soviets in 1938/1939. And then Nizis attacked, it was too late for Japanese.
Slightly different. The anti-war faction (read Yamamoto and his ilk) threw the news at the faces of more radical elements. It was like - "Take that you morons, your idols have sided with sworn enemy." It actually deterred Japan from going ahead much earlier with whatever they actually did in the Indo-Pacific. It was Barbarossa that gave the warmongers renewed impetus to start howling for war.

As for their Siberian ambition, that was abandoned after Khalkhyn Gol. It was anyway too impractical to realize.
 
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At Each Kilometer

Ad Honorem
Sep 2012
4,009
Bulgaria
Khalkhin Gol was an insignificant battle between Soviet Union/Mongolia and Kwantung Army of Manchuko.
The Kwantung Army has nothing to do with this Japanese puppet state. It was an IJA group and was considered the elite before Khalkhin Gol. Its prestige had declined greatly by the time of its surrender to the USSR due mainly to abandonment of the Northern Expansion Doctrine. Khalkhin Gol had changed the trajectory of expansionism of this empire and Southern Path had been chosen instead, towards Pearl Harbour, so idd Khalkhin Gol was quite insignificant.
 

holoow

Ad Honorem
Jun 2012
3,851
Vilnius, Lithuania
The Kwantung Army has nothing to do with this Japanese puppet state. It was an IJA group and was considered the elite before Khalkhin Gol. Its prestige had declined greatly by the time of its surrender to the USSR due mainly to abandonment of the Northern Expansion Doctrine. Khalkhin Gol had changed the trajectory of expansionism of this empire and Southern Path had been chosen instead, towards Pearl Harbour, so idd Khalkhin Gol was quite insignificant.
From Wikipedia article it's obvious what Japanese forces at Khalkhin Gol were quite insignificant. They don't topped 75000 soldiers ( according to Russian version of wiki article, I suppose to find even smaller number in Japanese sources ), while Kwantung Army in Manchzhu-di-go in 1939 had 270000 soldiers, Japanese forces in mainland China ( expect Manchzu-go ) by 1939 consisted of 850000 soldiers.