What if the a little ice age were to occur today?

Oct 2015
1,171
California
#1
What if the little ice age that happened from the 1300's to 1850 happened again today? Let's say the average global temperature were to drop in much the same way it did the last time the little ice age ocurred by 1-1.5 degree Celsius (2-3 degrees Fahrenheit) cooler ? Winters are colder and come earlier and lasts longer in Europe, north American and in northern Asia.
 
Oct 2015
1,171
California
#5
On a lighter note, the last time the Thames froze solid was in 1812 which was also the last "frost fair" held there. So maybe after 207 years, frost fairs will be held over the Thames again. On a darker, note is the EU prepared for the natural catastrophe of encroaching glaciers destroying farms and bringing famine and food shortages?
 
Likes: Niobe
Oct 2015
1,171
California
#8
the Dalton minimum is linked to a period of low Solar sunspots .
after a recent grand maximum we now have two cycles of decrease ,
the coming cycle 25 is predicted by NOOA to be not much better
Solar Cycle 25 Preliminary Forecast | NOAA / NWS Space Weather Prediction Center

Then again Solar physicists have a rate of failure in their predictions somewhat worst than elections polls
We are currently at a solar minimum in which the sun spots are completely gone triggering some to believe we're just about due for another ice age. However scientists aren't even sure what caused the little ice age of 1300-1850 with some believing it was caused by massive volcanic eruptions. But whatever caused it, earth wasn't producing as much green house gasses throughout the end of the Medieval warm period through the 1600s; the 1600s being the most intense of the little ice age. I'm just guessing here, but I wonder if the Industrial revolution and the increased production of green house gasses in the 1700-1800s had something to do with ending the little ice age?

There is also a new theory being floated out there that the Little Ice Age was caused by the eradication of the native Indian population of the Americas:

 

sparky

Ad Honorem
Jan 2017
4,828
Sydney
#9
interesting idea , the decrease in agriculture was a climate forcing
but then the vast expansion of agriculture production in the mid 1900 would then provoke some warming ??

as for the Solar effect , You are not the only one guessing
the subject has been argued ad nausea

the cold period following the medieval maximum seems to have been a "normal" climate fluctuation
the Maunder minimum was something else again , it was brutal , between 1645 and 1715 Europe and China shivered
the Dalton minimum was also linked to strong volcanic activity , however volcanoes influence tend to be of short duration

There is simply no consensus on Solar forcing , the subject is hotly ( pun ) debated
what is interesting is that we shall have a clearer view by 2025 / 26 that's when Cycle 25 is supposed to peak
 
Oct 2015
1,171
California
#10
interesting idea , the decrease in agriculture was a climate forcing
but then the vast expansion of agriculture production in the mid 1900 would then provoke some warming ??

as for the Solar effect , You are not the only one guessing
the subject has been argued ad nausea

the cold period following the medieval maximum seems to have been a "normal" climate fluctuation
the Maunder minimum was something else again , it was brutal , between 1645 and 1715 Europe and China shivered
the Dalton minimum was also linked to strong volcanic activity , however volcanoes influence tend to be of short duration

There is simply no consensus on Solar forcing , the subject is hotly ( pun ) debated
what is interesting is that we shall have a clearer view by 2025 / 26 that's when Cycle 25 is supposed to peak
You're right about volcanic activity's short term effect on the climate. The Pinatubo eruption caused a global cooling trend, but was short-lived. The cooling trend from that eruption lasted 2-3 years. In 1815 the Tambora eruption in Indonesia caused what was called "The Year Without a Summer" which made the little ice age particularly pretty bad that year with snow fall in summer killing crops in North America and Europe.
 

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