What if the Royalists won the English Civil War?

notgivenaway

Ad Honorem
Jun 2015
5,787
UK
To add, most Parliaments up until the early 18th century only met for several months at a time, and there were periods of years between their sittings. The concept of a full-time Parliament like today is a recent one - from the 19th century at best.
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,078
Navan, Ireland
..........................................

The American colonies were initially bolstered by Irish indentured servants, and English moves into America would not have existed without the Cromwellian Irish conquests. .......................................
Sorry why would this be so?
 

notgivenaway

Ad Honorem
Jun 2015
5,787
UK
Because the first major workers on plantations were indentured labourers. Most of these were Irish, but some were English too.
But the major inroads into what became America happened after the Restoration, especially with the English capture of New Amsterdam.
 

Kevinmeath

Ad Honoris
May 2011
14,078
Navan, Ireland
Because the first major workers on plantations were indentured labourers. Most of these were Irish, but some were English too.
But the major inroads into what became America happened after the Restoration, especially with the English capture of New Amsterdam.
Sorry whats your source that most were Irish?

To my knowledge there at least as many 'British' as Irish and indeed the first indentured servants were orphans taken from the streets of British cities.
 

betgo

Ad Honorem
Jul 2011
6,517
Because the first major workers on plantations were indentured labourers. Most of these were Irish, but some were English too.
But the major inroads into what became America happened after the Restoration, especially with the English capture of New Amsterdam.
There were large numbers of Irish sold as indentured servants after Cromwell's conquest of Ireland. I think most of them went to Barbados. Most of the indentured servants were convicts.

There aren't many Irish surnames in the US south from colonial times and there weren't Roman Catholics at that time except in Maryland. It is possible that there was some policy of sending Irish to islands rather than what became the US.

Indentured servants were not essential. There were not many in what became the US north. Of course, there were African and native American slaves.
 
May 2011
519
UK
Why did war break out, then?
Charles attempted to raise an army in Ireland to put down the rebellion there. Partly through paranoia and propaganda the parliamentarians feared Charles was conspiring to use this army in England against Parliament. At this stage both sides were paranoid against the other. Charles attempted to arrest the main parliamentary agitators who were stirring up all the rancor against him , the London militia was called out which was by now under the control of parliament, and forced Charles to flee the capital. At this point war became inevitable because by fleeing the seat of government without it's permission Charles has essentially abdicated his rule, and his setting up his own ruling council in Oford was considered illegal and unconstitutional
 
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May 2011
519
UK
Parliaments up until the late 17th/early 18th centuries were called whenever the King needed to raise taxes and fund military campaigns. There was no defined length, and could be dissolved or called whenever the King saw fit.
another point is that the Ship Money act of 1640 essentially made it illegal for the crown to levy taxes. following this all taxes since were levied by Parliament which itself guaranteed parliament's existence without any need for fighting
 

notgivenaway

Ad Honorem
Jun 2015
5,787
UK
There were large numbers of Irish sold as indentured servants after Cromwell's conquest of Ireland. I think most of them went to Barbados. Most of the indentured servants were convicts.

There aren't many Irish surnames in the US south from colonial times and there weren't Roman Catholics at that time except in Maryland. It is possible that there was some policy of sending Irish to islands rather than what became the US.

Indentured servants were not essential. There were not many in what became the US north. Of course, there were African and native American slaves.
The first plantation workers in the American colonies were indentured servants. It was only by Charles II's reign that African slaves were transported in a large way.,
 
Jan 2018
52
NL
"indentured servants"
I think you mean white slaves. Many became "indentured servants" against their will. The term is supposed to be used for a form of debt servitude, which then ends after a certain time and which is entered into freely.
For example in order to pay for the passage to the colonies.
But many of these "indentured servants" in British North America were either convicts (or indeed orphans) who were shipped off against their will and then forced to work for no pay (=slaves), or free men who were kidnapped or mislead and then forced to work for no pay (=slaves), or prisoners of war who were captured, shipped to the Americas and forced to work (=slaves).
 

notgivenaway

Ad Honorem
Jun 2015
5,787
UK
A number of them did stop working. It was distinct from slavery. it was the John Punch case in which a black indentured servant was made a lifetime servant, and some white colleagues were let off, that led in some way to race-based slavery. But to say many or all indentured servants were pressed into it for life, or were legally considered property, isn't true.